12

Shifting to the blackboard/whiteboard from the projector serves two main purposes: Slows down the pace of instruction. I can type much faster than I can write on the whiteboard. However, this is not always a good thing. When I'm discussing something complex or want to ensure my instruction does not move too quickly, I shift to writing things out. This ...


9

I'm working in TCS, so my lectures are relatively mathematical. For me, it's a rather clear split: Definitions, Inference Systems, etc.: Projector (+ lecture notes) Lemmas, Theorems: Projector (+ lecture notes) Proofs: Blackboard (+ lecture notes) Examples: Blackboard The advantages: I save some time compared to a blackboard-only lecture. I can refer to ...


7

I use a program called Zoomit (For Microsoft's Windows, by SysInternals), that lets you freeze and draw on the screen and zoom in on parts of it. I find it pretty useful when teaching, I came really dependent on it. It is free of charge and easy to use. Here is a very simple example:


6

You're absolutely right that it is unreasonable to expect students to pay attention 100% of the time, so we have to provide enough "fix-up" clues and cues that they can find the lesson again after a moment of wandering attention. I usually avoid having the kids watch me code for two reasons. One is exactly the problem that you've described: if the code ...


5

My poor blackboard1 only gets light use nowadays, I'm afraid. Coding examples are usually too large to put up there, all of my intricate diagrams are clarified with (judicious!) animations in PowerPoint, and my debugging gets demonstrated live on the projector screen. The humble blackboard has seen its role reduced in CS classrooms as the years have gone ...


5

I've been in rooms with smartboards that aren't dry erase marker safe which means if the smartboard goes down the board space is lost. I've never used a smartboard but think I get the most bang for the buck with a projector onto a whiteboard. We can project sites, code, etc and also annotate by writing on the board directly (although the annotations can't ...


4

One example is the front end web development concept of the box model. For those who do not know what the box model is, here is a graphic: I find that there is no real way to explain it without drawing it out. Usually, when I teach this, I've already covered basic HTML and CSS syntax, including a few properties (e.g. background). I like to give the example ...


3

Most IDEs are able to zoom just try Ctrll + Mouse wheel. Also IDEs do utilize Code highlighting on a dark background as it is less tiring this should also add to contrast and readability . Depending on age and experience level of your students, i would like to recommend your Students to use an IDE that is able to show code diffs. If you provide them, with ...


3

Yes. I have a web development class. If more than 5 people connect to the free hosting site, it stops anyone else from connecting via FTP, since we appear to all have the same IP address. Multiple connections from the same site can be a script running, and most users will not appear to have multiple connections. I do: Demo using the FTP client, go through ...


3

I'll be using Thonny http://thonny.org/ this year for Python in particular. It has great code tracing and debugging features, good syntax highlighting and was built with beginners in mind.


3

The last time I used a whiteboard as a whiteboard was to describe a maze building algorithm. It was a small-ish board that I put on the ground and drew a grid. I then stepped in a square and we walked (literally and algorithmically) through the algorithm where I built the maze. The whiteboard on the front of my room gets used sometimes when I want to write ...


3

You can use a blackboard with a fun on board example: A good way to explain what the computer does while executing a recursive method, is to debug a (simple) recursive method. This is done by hand (on the blackboard) by going through the method line by line, and with every recursive call, going down 1 line (on the board) and indenting. Then going through ...


2

I had a smart board at previous school. I used it when we did scratch, and it worked fairly well for that. Not as useful when teaching typed languages. But the screen was pretty small relative to the size of my room so it was tough to see from the back of the room. My room now doesn't have a smart board, but has a very large projector screen and it's way ...


2

Although you may think mine is a less than serious answer, the best example I have seen for the use of a smart-board in computer science is in a video from De Pauw University, when they implement a time machine to explain program code debugging. I just love it, and show it to my students every year!


2

I've had it go the other way... Website (self hosted Moodle) worked while we set it up. Worked fine first period. Something got triggered on the school network and decided that too many students were going to the site so it got blocked. Same as you I could still get to it from my computer, but students couldn't.


2

Assuming you have a standard projector, here are two ways that I do this: A printout. Nothing like going old-school and having physical paper in front of you. Your students can't see what you've got written down. As a side benefit, you can comment in notes about things to say. Want to code in some errors and then fix them to make a point? It's easy to ...


2

It is very common for institutions to use a single IP address and Network Address Translation (NAT) to avoid the problems of getting and maintaining a larger IP address space. As a result a website experiences all of the traffic from the institution as a single user. Depending on the threshold for password failures or rate limiting the traffic may see the ...


2

What language are you teaching / using in lectures? For Python, I've been to a lot of professional tutorials that use Jupyter Notebooks that they also distribute to participants beforehand. Students can then follow along, play with the code "live", save changes, type in their own comments / notes, etc.


2

To highlight your code changes, you could try using the Git support of your IDE. The text editor Atom as well as the JetBrains IDEs (like IntelliJ or PyCharm) highlight inserted, changed or removed lines by coloring the border green, yellow or red, as long as the changes are uncommitted. Combined with a high zoom level or fullscreen mode this could help ...


2

I believe that using one key for access, even with unique passwords, is inadvisable. Teaching moments aside, each student should have their own, revocable, restrict-able, key pair. However, as I understand the intentions, you should be able to achieve your goal this way. Short answer Point 1: Edit the instance's /etc/ssh/sshd_config file and check that ...


1

I have a notebook that's mirrored to a ceiling mounted projector. And I use multiple desktops on Windows 10 to switch between applications if I'm doing more than one thing. I usually go from memory, but have a printed copy of what I'm demoing to fall back on just in case. Also have Adobe Connect running so that students can mirror my screen to their screen....


1

Our district has Adobe Connect. It's used mostly for remote training, but any of us have access to setup classes. I use it pretty much any time I demo. I also project my screen. Most watch on their screens while they're typing, but some like to look at the projector screen.


1

TLDR; Use open broadcast system and you can stream over lan quite easily. You can use OBS configs and set up ffmpeg to broadcast over multicast address. Or set up nginx as an RTMP server Notes and thoughts Why OBS? First and foremost, I use it and I love it :-) It's a completely free, and fully open source software that deploys very quickly. Open broadcast ...


1

We've used Impero in our labs quite successfully. It allowed me to broadcast my screen to 30 others as well as quickly jump in and take control of other screens if a student was stuck. It is paid and we've used it throughout the school, not just for CS. Network managers use it for quickly trouble-shooting pupil machines for instance.


1

I know of two bits of software that can do what you want. They do what you are looking for, display stuff on their screen and do demonstrations on their screen. They also lets you spy on your pupils, blank screens, lock screens (useful if they are not paying attention), and shutdown computers at end of day. AB Tutor I have used this software, in the schools ...


1

Write and Draw on a Projected Board. [I must acknowledge that somewhere above no comprende has commented this already, but I have my own variation. ] As much as possible, I always project on a board on which I can write. That way, I can zoom in, and draw circles and shapes around the code I want the students to focus. However, a huge problem is that the ...


1

There may be a psychological-physiological learning advantage to having students see solutions or code presented at nearly the same rate as the student would write or type in the code themselves. Having N steps appear (especially if it exceeds 7+-2 cognitive units), all at once, might overload a student's short term memory, and thus can result in some of ...


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