9

Something like the following has worked for me over several years. In any group assignment, each member of the group also submits a peer review sheet. For a group of two (e.g. pair programming) I ask each participant to detail the most important contribution of their partner AND their own most important contribution. I don't ask who worked harder or ask them ...


9

What's the point? Why does the number of lines in the project matter all that much? Unless the code is extraordinarily long or short (i.e. orders of magnitude away from what is expected), lines of code aren't a good indicator of whether a project is good or bad. I've heard of one example where some students were set the task of creating a Caesar cipher1 ...


6

It is true that these issues can be problematic in some cases, however, this depends on the context and the usage of the class. The "design problem" that you were hoping they would find also depends on the context and usage of the class. We have no idea whether the users of this class are obeying your JavaDoc. In fact, I could see an argument that your "...


5

I'm surprised that you didn't ask this teacher why she asked this question and how it fits into her overall evaluation. I don't think anyone can answer this question without more information. We can speculate on situations in which it might be a good question and we can speculate on situations in which it might be a terrible question, but we can't know ...


4

As part of an algorithms module (first-year undergraduate level), I got students to choose a computational problem from a list of options I provided, write an algorithm to solve it, and write a 750-word report explaining: The problem in their own words, How their algorithm works (with code), and How they tested it. Students had a few weeks to complete this ...


4

My worry here is that there is no general solution other than to improve any question when you reuse it based on the answers you saw in the past. I have to admit that, even as a very experienced Java developer who is also very Pattern literate, I missed it entirely since I didn't actually read the Javadoc before I looked at the code. I came up with only ...


4

How can I manage peer evaluation so that I get useful information for grading, for advisement, and for course improvement [re] ...on group projects. I use peer evaluation forms as a part of group projects as discussed by @Buffy above, and I also split the marks between group and individual elements. Taking the question in a wider context, I'll just ...


3

I would break the question into parts. You can put a short paragraph describing what the code in front of them is supposed to do. When one (or more) writes code for something, the design is inseparable from the purpose of the code. Following the paragraph, put the code. Also, I suggest changing the documentation of the code by adding a short description ...


3

Simple demonstration: Presenting this and asking, "What do you see?" is sure to get a variety of answers. Most might be along the line of a bird feeding baby birds. Not all will be, however. Possible answers include "A bunch of birds," "A birds' nest," "Tiny leaves," "A pretty picture," and even "A fuzzy background." None are wrong, and all will show what ...


3

I agree with the other posters here: using num LoC as an indicator is a very poor assessment of the code. I would ask instead: 1) Does it work 2) Is it readable? 3) Has it followed the correct conventions? Spacing, layout, indentation etc. 4) is it modular: resusable, logically broken into functions/methods with appropriate names for funcs/methods and ...


2

Reason 1 : Because without printing it out you can not weigh it. When I was an university, there was a myth that some lazy teachers (I don't know the technical terms for the roles), would weigh your reports, and give a grade base on that. I heard of one student that handed in some work with a load of blank paper attached, and got a good grade. Reason 2 : ...


2

As others have noted, the simple lines of code doesn't always have a lot of meaning in terms of the project's quality. My guess is that the question is primarily intended to catch the outliers, those projects with a lot less or more code than average. In the programming industry I have noticed an odd trend among certain programmers that go through great ...


2

Because it is an easy question to start with? It only takes seconds to count the LOC in a project. Faster than asking. So the point is not the factual information by itself. The point is starting an interview with a nervous student, about a project of some size. Not a 20 lines exercise for which an interview with each student is a waste of time. Question ...


2

I agree with kaya3. You can assign open-ended projects where students apply techniques from the course. Or you can give them more structured projects, e.g., from this book by Havill (the website includes skeleton code): http://discovercs.denison.edu/ or inspired by these data science projects by Nolan and Temple Lang: http://rdatasciencecases.org/Data.html ...


1

If your main concern is related to cheating in tests, there are some ways to somehow minimize it (not 100%, though). I am in "forced" quarantine since March 4th, so, almost all the 2nd semester is held online (I haven't returned to the uni since, so haven't the students). :) I and all the CS teachers at my Uni rely mostly on small quizzes, oral ...


1

In my program, we have a year-long culminating capstone project which has a format that might work well for you. Traditionally, high school seniors in this area of the world catch a disease called "senioritis" that prevents them from doing a lot of work as they enter into the last few months of high school. It's a highly contagious disease, though once ...


1

The scenario here doesn't really give much context for the evaluator's question. Most importantly, we have no information about what she did as a result of the opening question. It is perfectly possible that this opening was a hidden request for context - is the presenter actually familiar with the code or just doing the PR part of the project? By asking a '...


1

Unless the student is some kind of an expert already, lines of code will be a easy way to filter out those who have no idea what they are doing. Lets say the lab manual has about 30 lines for the bubble sort implementation. Leaving out exceptionally talented students, most students would have at least 30 lines, and if they don't they probably haven't ...


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