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I know where to find the percentage of CS bachelor's degrees going to women in the US (Figure 2-16) and the percentage of CS bachelor's degrees going to people of different ethnicities at research universities in the US and Canada participating in the Taulbee Survey (Table B-3). Where, if anywhere, can I find the percentage of bachelor's degree in CS, ideally over time, broken down by both ethnicity and gender?

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Two possible sources are

Unfortunately SAUS went dark in 2012 but back additions can be found at the Census Bureau. The latest numbers are old, but not yet irrelevant.

Sorry that this is just links, but I don't know what else to say.

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the Taulbee report An-In Depth Examination of Data and Trends Regarding Women in Computing provides summary data on computing degrees by ethnicity & gender for 2013 in Table 2 on pg 20 and cites the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) as their data source. You can either filter through their data online or download it:

Data are available starting with the 1980-81 collection year for the Complete data files and Custom data files functions, which zip the data into comma separated value (*csv). Beginning with the 2010-11 collection year, data for each collection year are compiled into an Access database.

Some tips for using their online data statistics:

  • Try using the 'Statistical Tables' option on the 'Use the Data' page
  • When select institutions, if you select 'By variables', there's an entry called 'Completions' which has an option for reporting 'Number of students receiving awards/degrees, by race/ethnicity and gender'
  • After that, select the specific gender/ethnicity info you're filtering for
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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. FWIW, I tried going to IPEDS to get more recent data myself and couldn't figure out how to. $\endgroup$ – Ellen Spertus Jul 13 '17 at 18:13
  • $\begingroup$ @EllenSpertus Yes, it's not very intuitive. I added some info on how I used their system. Alternatively, you could contact their help desk by phone or email as described at nces.ed.gov/ipeds/Home/Questions $\endgroup$ – Pikalek Jul 14 '17 at 2:12

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