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Teaching web programming would be self defeating to the topic. On the other had using examples of parsing “CSS” files or “HTML” files would aid them in learning web development, while maintaining the intended goal of the course. Personally I hate web development as a matter of personal taste. I wish my school offered a “C” programming class. It is truly ...


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I don't know what options are open to you, so I'll hope you have a free hand. I certainly did as I got farther along in my career, but a newcomer might think this is risky. In fact it is well proven: I'd suggest that you base much of the grading on the work of groups rather than individuals and I would flip the classroom. This gives you the advantage of ...


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In other cases I would just simply advise against offering a course open to people with widely varied skill levels, because it forces you to basically scale it down to the lowest acceptable level. Normally, you would like to say "sign up for the course on Y only if you already know how to do X". But in this case, knowledge of HTML(+++) is something that is ...


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Just about everything you need can be found in one or another book. O'Reilly has a large selection of reputable work. (No affiliation) But a topical search online or at Amazon will get you what you need. If you prefer video, a search at YouTube, say, will turn up lots of possibilities. Prefer recent books and videos, however. Straight html is seldom used ...


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Another option, in addition to Buffy's, is to create tiered assignments. Then students can either opt in to the level that they choose, or you can specify fully ("freshman must take option 1), or you can set certain parameters ("seniors must choose at least level 3 of this assignment for full credit.") Grading should not be substantially more difficult as ...


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