7

The "problem" with the dragon book is that it is so complete; intentionally so. Over its lifetime there have been tremendous advances in the theory and practice of building compilers. If you want "state of the art", then you want the dragon book, probably a later (harder) edition, even. But it is a bit much, as you have seen, for a first ...


6

If he wants to have a blast biting into some very fun and challenging problems, Project Euler is fantastic, and entirely language neutral. He may find that certain problems are out of his grasp until he learns a bit more programming, but there will be many that will be possible even with what he has. (Arrays, structs, and pointers should make all of the ...


6

Although the question is asking for a book, looking a "Project Euler" mentioned in another answer, I would like to suggest Codewars might be what you are looking for. On codewars you choose your programming language and then you get different levels of problems to solve step by step. You not only test your answer with their built-in testing tool ...


5

The International Olympiad in Informatics is an international competition for gifted young amateur programmers. The tasks from past editions are available online, including detailed problem descriptions, test cases, and test harnesses. While these tasks are described in a way that should be understandable to novice programmers, they are quite challenging and ...


3

Back in 2017 I faced the exactly the same problem, except that it was MEAN. So I bought the book "Getting MEAN". It had good reviews, probably the best review about MEAN. But then I found I didn't actually read the book too much because javascript changes so much every year that many things I read from the book may be obsoleted. Every time I read ...


3

I last taught the Compiler course in 2008, that's a longtime with probably newer books have appeared. (ie sorry if the answer is somehow outdated) But I did had the same complains from the students, then one of them (Hussain Hassan Mehanna, he's probably a prof in UK now) told me that his friend in AUC uses a book called "Compiler Construction, ...


3

A very nice book is Downey's "Think Python" (2nd edition). The link leads you to a free PDF, so you can take a look without cost. It teaches problem solving using Python, not Python per se. Make sure you get the second edition, which covers Python 3 (a somewhat different language than the obsolete Python 2). There are lots of pointers to ...


3

Disclaimer 1: I haven't seen the book, and I have no idea what exercises it offers. Disclaimer 2: I haven't seen your brother's code. The goal of an easy exercise is to learn how to write the perfect code. OTOH, the beginner's code tends to be sloppy. For starters, point your brother to the Code Review exchange. When the community is comfortable, let him go ...


1

There's genuinely not enough to go on here to find the book with online searches. However, you can find a listing of every book on BASIC ever published at the Library of Congress, all organized into various subcategories. Your book is almost certainly in there. https://catalog.loc.gov/vwebv/search?searchArg=BASIC%20(Computer%20program%20language)&...


1

other resources/advice are welcome One topic worthy of teaching related to 3d graphics is collision detection. Many people get it wrong on their first and even first few attempts. To really get it correct you have to study the mechanics of how the real world and modeled world differ and how to correctly model the problem. If you are doing 3d graphics ...


1

Take a look at Runestone Interactive They have several books. In particular in the US there are college credits that can be earned with special high school courses (Advanced Placement). One of the courses for this is called CS Awesome. There is also a teacher web site for CS Awesome.


1

The book by Jeff Erickson, "Algorithms" is a (tough!) next step after getting confortable with the basics.


1

Not exactly exercises, but you learn a lot about programming by working through books like Kernighan and Pike's "The practice of programming" (Addison-Wesley, 1999) and Bentley's "Programming Pearls" (Addison Wesley, 2nd edition 1999). They are not books on any language's syntax, they show how to solve though problems elegantly. Be ...


1

Recently I've been reading through Richard Pawson's book on functional programming aimed at A-Level teaching. I teach the subject at A-Level so I'm always on the lookout for good resources. So far (I have read as far as chapter 6) it is the best explanation of FP I have come across. It comes with 60 exercises and an EAD which students can write their answers ...


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