6

First, just a disambiguation: are you teaching Assembly language or C? Cos, they are not same as your question seems to suggest. C is a high-level procedural clean code language with tremendous abilities to speak to the bare metal similar to but not as Assembler pls. It may help you bridge to assembly but it is not assembly. Let that be clear to your ...


5

We've been using Discord as a central place for all class discussion, and Zoom only for live lessons (rare) and small group meetings, and unpublished YouTube links for most lectures. So far this has been working quite well. If I'm totally honest, Discord may be the best part of our workflow. Discord gives a nice sense of community and comity. Its informal ...


4

You may not win if you just use words. Instead, give them interesting but challenging exercises to do. One of the most fun exercises I ever did was to produce a Quine in assembly language. But, instead of producing a textual version of itself, as most Quines do, it produces a running copy in memory and then executes (branches to) that copy. The copy seems ...


3

We use Zoom (school-mandated for classes), students organized Discord rooms for contact with the TAs (and I believe among themselves), I understand they also have Facebook and WhatsApp and probably Telegram groups for study groups and other more informal contacts. We are all in explorarory mode, I'd just say "use what works".


2

I have been fighting this for 30 years without a true solution. I think it is human nature to take the shortest way and if that involves copying code the students will do it. I teach at a high school and my classes are small enough to actually see the kids code so I have less issue with this than those teachers with large classes or classes where the ...


2

Rephrasing a language construct is a part of a program that does some special work This is indeed too vague. First of all, every program is built specifically to do a particular job. "Special" is subjective, often synonymous with "custom tailored" and thus any program can be called a "special work". By logical extension, any part of a program is ...


2

Like you and one of the other answerers (as of writing this), in a class I TA for, we use Zoom for lectures and Discord for something else--in our case, we use Discord for office hours (undergrad, grad, and professor). Some of our TAs were the ones who thought of using a Discord server when we first moved everything online, so they ran the idea by the ...


2

Forth is very interesting language which can run on bare metal, and also be as high level as you want (I've see a compiler/interpreter of subset of Pascal implemented in 11 pages) and will stretch brain of your students. I know it did mine :-) And is trivial to code some definitions in Assembly if you want. Code is incredibly compact, ideal (and still ...


2

I don't normally answer questions that I've voted to close, but I'll make an exception here. I think your quest is doomed. Sorry. I also think that pressing is just going to make it worse. Perhaps you can impress that on the mother. One can be successful in applied math or physics without programming. It is a helpful tool, but not essential for ...


2

The best approach to learning just about everything is twofold. You need to practice and you need feedback on your attempt. You learn by reinforcement, not by seeing something once. This is why coursework depends on student exercises, not just lectures and textbooks. So, to learn a new thing, I suggest that you first get an overview idea of it, say from ...


1

All of the best fliers I found were at the NCWIT website: Computer science is for everyone, pp. 13-16 Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Computing and Information Technology? (also in Spanish) Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers Which computing pathway is right for me? (also in ...


1

I would argue the best way to do this is have some demonstrations prepared: things they can build with the tools you're teaching that "look" flashy and exciting. Show some cool programs written in C, demonstrate some sort of Arduino-based program that looks interesting (a relatively simple one I've seen waters plants), something in assembly that looks ...


1

A "programming construct" is a sequence of zero or more words and symbols that is legal for the language and also complete. The above mostly works, but not all programming systems are built from words and symbols. One can program graphically, for example. Therefore "sequence" isn't quite right. But it works for the majority of common languages. There are ...


1

The fix is in accepting that failure, sometimes repeated failure, is not merely an option, but is absolutely necessary and an integral part of success. The goal is to reduce the number of drop-outs: students who start a program, but leave it before completion. Is it? Who says so? Is that yet another law of Nature we forgot to be told about? There are ...


1

The persons who could answer your question best are the students themselves. Why don't you ask them? Seriously though, there might be a host of reasons why a given person is novelty-shy. First of all, however pleasant knowledge might be, any learning process is intrinsically painful, so some reluctance is only to be expected from any pupil or student at ...


1

I think the answer is "yes". It seems obvious that there is a segment of the population with severe intellectual disabilities, severe learning disabilities, brain damage, cognitive inability to read or do problem-solving, etc., who will be unable to do programming. The real, difficult, question is: What percentage of the population is that? (Or perhaps, as ...


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