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4

I would say yes, definitely. It is a great bunch of well informed and friendly people. The conferences are very valuable, including the panel discussions, demos, and tutorials. The SIGCSE conference is also a place at which some of your students might publish and, if they are interested in teaching as a career, meet people who can help them. The people who ...


4

Yes! (with some qualifications.) Benefits (most apply to conference attendance): connections with other teachers to share ideas and experience research results on CS teaching practices/methods TIME away from class to reflect and plan broader perspective on new/existing computing curricula (especially honest feedback on others' experience with CS material/...


3

I started teaching CS in higher ed and knew of ACM. CSTA was not really around when I joined SIGCSE. I think that both are great for K-12 CS teachers. I am not directly in the classroom today, but I am more involved in policy I consider both organizations critical for that work. For example, many states are now implementing CS standards. The amazing ...


3

I've known many HS teachers who have joined and become valued members. I think it is most useful for those contemplating further graduate study and seeking contacts and research ideas and such. Some have gone on to earn doctorates. However, for your stated goal, you will find that the members there, while not focused on secondary education, will have a lot ...


3

Part of the answer depends on where one is in his/her career and the type of institution that one works at. If one is non-tenured and at the beginning of his/her career in a hard-core CS department at a heavily research-oriented institution, I would say no. Many such institutions do not even recognize acceptance at papers at educational conferences when ...


2

There's a difference between CS and CS Education. SIGCSE is not the only organization focused on pedagogical and curricular CS issues but it is arguably the leading such organization in the world. It provides a steady stream of useful teaching ideas and is a venue where new curriculum is developed and existing curriculum reshaped.


2

The information on the SIGCSE mailing list is well worth the $25/year SIGCSE fee. Better yet, this discount you get off the SIGCSE conference registration is more than the cost of joining SIGCSE.


1

It depends on what you want to get out of it. There are plenty of CS outreach opportunities that don't require a membership fee: Code.org Annual scholars day at the university Hackathons CS Meetups CS Advisory Committe (does your university have one?) Your university's ACM or IEEE chapter CoderDojo (up to high school level)


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