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I teach classes that each use different languages: Python, C#, Visual Basic, Thunkable, Scratch, Alice, Small Basic and a few other odds and ends. I am not good in any of them off hand, but I have a set of resource locations that will refresh my memory or show me the important features of the languages. I learn how to learn languages. I get the language ...


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An effective way to learn another programming language is learning compared to the known language.   Ideally I think one language should be learned for each important paradigm: C / C ++ for imperative / objective paradigms, lisp / Haskel for functional paradigm and SQL for declarative paradigm - the rest of the languages being a combination of these ...


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It is just like learning how to ride a bike: by programming. And by reading good (and also bad!) programs critically. Pick some (simple!) problem to solve, have a go at it. Look for some open source package that interests you, pick some "for newbies" task (if they advertise some). Check out textbooks and tutorials for your favourite language. Look around ...


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Motivation to work through "boring" material can be from knowing that it is the required foundation for more interesting stuff. Or you might try to find some interesting angle to it. Perhaps it is presented to you in a way that doesn't match your style, look for alternative expositions (other lecture notes, videos on YouTube, rummage around in Wikipedia to ...


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You need to understand the problem the data structure is trying to solve, how it is used (algorithms around it). You need to be able to see any alternatives and their advantages and disadvantages, specially when managing lots of data. You need some guide, concrete problems to solve, somebody who tells you the relevant mathematics (yes, understanding why one ...


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Based on what you say about yourself, I'd guess that the Cornel system is probably better than either of the other two described here. But that is just because you suggest that you seem to lack the ability, currently, to pull out the big ideas as they occur and the other two methods depend on doing that. But, the goal of all of this isn't really effective ...


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Let me offer you another perspective. Since you study at a liberal arts college, I presume you are not majoring in computer science. So, the book you are talking about (Cormen's) isn't really a simple one. It is intended for CS students with a certain background that you might lack. There is not much profit in trundling through a difficult book if you ...


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I would add to Buffy's completely wonderful answer only this: do not fret too much if you don't always get the questions on your own, particularly in a self-learning context. Many of these algorithms took brilliant people years to come up with, and while they have now been well established and boiled down to their essentials, do not be fooled; they ...


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While it isn't necessary to do every exercise in a book, it is important to be able to do every exercise in the book. Similarly, while it isn't necessary to write every algorithm, it is necessary to be able to write every algorithm. But learning is another issue. Reading alone isn't enough to learn something. I think you already understand that. You need ...


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