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2

This answer is a complement to Buffy's and is more oriented towards future applications of autograding. The description of the assignment gave me the impression that your autograder is rather lazy. Instead of checking whether the functions the students have written are correct it executes a bunch of operations and compare a checksum of the result. ...


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There are some great answers and discussion here about reasons why a teacher may forbid certain syntactic constructs for a given assessment. I have an additional perspective on it. A student cannot possibly learn the entire language all at once. Not only is there syntax to learn, but also how to put the pieces together into coherent programs. It is a lot to ...


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To give a more detailed example to @thesecretmaster's answer: Sometimes language constructs hide the underlying complexity. That might be beneficial when coding, but counterproductive when teaching. Take these loop examples: for (int i=0; i<n; ++i) { // example statement array[i] = 5; } In many languages, this can be written as a for-each loop (...


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Students need to learn how to deal with strict rules, imposed by their programming environment. In real life, the rules are dictated by the limit of your programming language or processor. Easy example: You cannot use an instruction, that is not implemented in your microprocessor. So you need to stick to the rules of your processor. When you now use a ...


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Benefit: forces students to stay with and practice required concepts of the unit/exam or subset of the course.


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In addition to the good reasons given in the other answers: Sometimes students find code on the Internet that they can just copy into the assignment without understanding. In a coding class it seems reasonable to require students to understand the code they submit. As an instructor I would consider telling students that if they use techniques not covered ...


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