27

I find that the best introductory IDE is a lack thereof because, for the most part, the features that an IDE offers (code completion, organization, etc.) are more hurt than help and tend to promote completely unrelated questions, for example, "What is this dropdown under the word I just typed" and other questions about IDE function rather than language ...


11

The latest generation of text editors, e.g. Sublime, Atom, Visual Studio Code, are great, and seem to offer all that one might want from an IDE. I've a soft spot for Atom, but don't rule the others out. Another option might be to try Jupyter Notebooks in the web browser. Not an IDE in the traditional sense, but a good introduction to playing with code and ...


10

In the context of front-end development, I suggest looking into CodePen. For each "pen" you can get an instant visual as to how your HTML/CSS/JS affect your page. Additionally, you can immediately begin working in a pen without having to create an account, which may be a factor given the age of your students. At the very least, it might be a good teaching ...


8

I don't think the tool (or learning the tool) should get in the way of learning the initial core of the subject. If students are already comfortable with NotePad (or TextEdit, et.al.), why add to their cognitive load (7+-2) and the number of steps needed in getting their first few lines of Javascript running? The IDE can come later, when the code no ...


7

Honestly, I would be surprised if this method bore the kind of fruit that you hope for. While flowcharts seem like a nice way to make ideas more concrete, I contend that they will actually become another level of abstraction that makes the task harder for middle-school students, who are only now making the transition from concrete to abstract thinking. You'...


4

There is a point, somewhere around where puberty starts but I don't think identical, in which the brain changes its structure. It is much more capable of abstraction after that point than before. Young kids don't do a lot of generalization, for example, adults do. So, perhaps the study just captures part of that. I don't have it available, but I think ...


4

My grand-daughter is interested in programming and has been from the age of 5 or so (and is now nearly 10). I teach programming at university and my son-in-law (her father) teaches at secondary school level so we both have experience at teaching different age ranges. We find the Usborne books to be very useful for that age range, and they are so interesting ...


4

You might want to explore CS Unplugged for use with any youngster. While it doesn't use programming, it provides some foundation in computational thinking and provides some metaphors, etc, that might be useful to learning even in an environment where the student is learning to program. I don't think it is necessary to do everything in the CS Unplugged ...


4

You are correct in considering Sublime text, or atom text editor as they are light weight and more importantly will be hassle free for school kids. But one should also keep in mind considering school kids IDEs are too much to learn or get to know how to work on it therefore at these initial stages text-editors like said above and VScode which at least for ...


4

I go for simple. This year we used either an online editor or the free version of JCreator specifically because they don't have autocomplete. What I noticed last year using NetBeans is that students become dependent on autocomplete. When writing code on paper - I teach mostly AP CompSci so paper is necessary - kids would struggle to remember method names ...


2

This is a very good and important question. People have doubted the usefulness of flowcharts for a long time, and derided them. But I have two things to say in their defense. It is vital to demonstrate that a correctly structured flowchart and basic pseudocode are one-to-one interchangeable, line by line. Each statement and line in the chart exactly matches ...


2

I haven't seen a lot of resources in the US for that age group, though England seems to publish a great deal of high quality KS2 (Key Stage 2, ages 7-11) material. What's particularly nice is the focus on Computer Science concepts and computational thinking over simple programming exercise, even at this young age. Take a look at these BBC Resources from ...


2

The answer can be very broad because of personal taste :) But you may want to check MS Visual Studio IDE which you can "minimize" for the purpose of education. And then extend if step by step.


2

For Java ideas, look at the free to join Greenroom that is a resource collection place for the Greenfoot programming environment. There are a wide variety of project (see Resources) for programming projects within this environment. Greenfoot is a scaffolding environment based on a grid like world that contains objects of various kinds that the student ...


2

These "laws" mostly reflect how people learn, so they are still quite relevant. But going through: ("Know thoroughly and familiarly the lesson you wish to teach; or, in other words, teach from a full mind and a clear understanding") is interesting in a CS context, since we often don't have fantastic knowledge of the material, because it ...


1

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Code.org (computer science curricula for middle-high school students page) so I will! They have a plethora of courses and short activities that allow students to develop games, apps, and websites in block-based languages and Javascript for free. They walk through the concepts very slowly and have videos and tutorials ...


1

I recommend a look at the K12 CS Framework. Also, since this question was originally asked, a number of states have released their own standards. Some examples: Oklahoma Indiana Washington.


1

I have taught problem solving to older learners who studied a range of diagnostic, design and contingency problems. I'm not sure what age group you are talking about which would be handy to know in answering this question. This is a diagnostic group activity solvable using informal constraint satisfaction. https://sites.lsa.umich.edu/inclusive-teaching/2017/...


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