29

I apologize in advance, but I'm going to be a bit hard on you. First, your goal of keeping it simple is a good one that I applaud. You are right, IMO, not to bring in advanced features too early. However, this is not the sort of code I would show to a beginner. Ever. It is the kind of code that, if submitted by an early teen would be fine, but not the ...


5

Middle school is a great place to start teaching kids programming, and especially JavaScript. I have guest taught something similar for third graders, and it went so much better than I had expected. Code structure is not important for introductions. Engagement is the most important aspect for kids, and building a game is a great way to do that. At the ...


2

I think if you're teaching anyone something like programming, you should show them the elements in isolation first, and then combine them once they seem to have a grasp of what you taught them. (software's great for this, since a "statement" is a pretty generic concept) I'm assuming you mean "function" in the sense of a callable function which runs a block ...


1

To answer your question directly, I think it would make sense to teach the students the more complicated looping structure first, so that they maintain a good sense of what clean code looks like. Unless, of course, you're going to teach them looping later on in the same lesson and want to use this as an example of bad code, but if you're just introducing ...


1

I wouldn't. Based on my experiences as a student teacher in the Australian education system, typically actual coding doesn't get taught until grades 9-10, at which point the language is typically Python because of its relatively simple syntax. At the age range you're discussing, students are typically taught a visual block programming language like Scratch ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible