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I don't think there are any published tools to generate programming assignments, though there are articles that describe such tools (such as this one from a CUNY, or this one from Croatia, so one option is to try to contact those authors and find out whether they would share their results with you.) I will state categorically that there is no way of ...


6

I agree with Ben I. and Buffy. I'm planning to cancel the remaining exams in the semester (assuming my university ends up moving to online instruction) and replace them with projects. Many studies have shown that project-based learning is more effective for most learners, and especially for learners from underrepresented groups. That said, if I needed to ...


5

I would suggest two things. Both of them, however, require that you give them printouts of the code so that they can make notations of their own without having to use any tool. Just write on the paper. Also, I'm assuming that your code is in small pieces, say, short methods. For me, a method is long at about five lines and a method that covers a page is ...


4

Fingers crossed that this one doesn't get closed. I've tried to do something similar, but it hasn't come out well. Hoping that some others have suggestions. It looks like they're using some sort of overlay or whiteboarding software, and I assume a tablet or stylus. I can see a cursor where their pen is drawing. I've tried this, and it didn't go well. But, ...


4

I'm taking a very basic approach when I do it: I use my Editor and comment line by line. This way I can directly show alternatives and effects if something does not work as planned. Usually I'm developing the code live to avoid that students get distracted by the code to come. The good thing about this approach is, you can show them how you can develop a ...


4

You need to know about http://pythontutor.com/ - they have line-by-line execution and a diagram showing memory and how it changes. They also have more than just Python, they have Java, C, C++, JavaScript, & Ruby I have used this resource in my classes and it makes it so amazing to explain how memory, references, and classes work. The C tutor really ...


3

I don't think this is the software in question, but one product that can produce similar results is Explain Everything. I used it to create short grammar review videos back in my English teaching days, and they were very similar in style to this. That was back on a second generation iPad, so I can only imagine how much sharper results would be on, say, an ...


3

OBS Studio fills your description. It is not the easiest program to use, but you can find plenty of tutorials on YouTube. While rewinding the recording again might seem appealing, it is very common to find out more errors after you complete the recording. In that case, you need a better video editor. OBS studio might be enough, but shotcut is your best bet.


3

I have a few thoughts on this topic. One is a couple ideas about how quizzes could be implemented (if you choose to use them), and the other is some more general thoughts on the tactics that I use to solve problems like this. Quizzes Without Extra Grading What are your opinions on peer grading or self-grading? I've seen both work nicely for things like ...


3

I create code-comprehension sheets outlined in one of two ways (depending on the code): code on the left, with questions on the right, or code with questions interspersed like comments. There are a few uses for such sheets: Check comprehension of what we've just gone over. Force students to try to examine and digest code prior to going over it together (to ...


3

Here are two ideas that might meet your needs: Codingbat allows you to create a teacher account and your own problem sets. You have to put in test values for all of your functions, but you can see the results that your students produce. A worksheet. "Now that we've covered that idea, go ahead and see what you can do with number 4 on your sheet." Since ...


3

When I was a TA, we used tools to automatically: Collect submissions and run them against set of predefined test cases Give instant feedback to students on how they did based on the test cases they passed/failed Give feedback on the quality of their code Generate plagiarism reports For plagiarism, we used MOSS. For everything else, we developed a tool ...


2

I am a TA at a University and yes we do use code snapshot tools but for confidentiality reasons I cannot tell you which one we use. It works extremely well for checking plagiarism, but that's about it. I don't know what other metrics you obtain, but I think it is pretty hard to trust someone's code without reviewing with them. We also automark their code and ...


2

I am not a video pro, but I do enough studio work to recognize the technique. I use parts of this technique every week in live webcasts, albeit with additional hardware to overlay the graphic on the camera feed. Take a whiteboard, draw your pictures. Snap photos. Edit and clean up the photos so the backgrounds are white set up slides in PowerPoint. Use ...


2

I highly recommend using Jupyter Notebooks. These provide a system for integrated code + narrative. You can get a quick sense of the results by looking at https://github.com/rajathkmp/Python-Lectures/blob/master/04.ipynb You can also see a video at https://youtu.be/wpBPGF0yQ9E?t=88 that uses the basic interface. Students can easily set this up on a Win/...


2

One of our instructors at CSU does his entire course web site using Pmwiki, which uses a markup language. If you follow certain conventions, it can be converted to a slide show in the browser. For an example how this works, see https://www.cs.colostate.edu/~cs253/Spring19/ This is a C++ course for students in the second year. On the home page is a link to ...


2

pandoc can convert slides written in markdown to a html presentation using reveal.js. pandoc can go markdown->latex (beamer) too. Not sure about going latex->reveal.js but it could be possible.


2

Think about it a bit more generally. If all you want is to force their engagement, then it will probably work to some extent, with most of them. But if you expand the goal you can do much more. A quiz immediately after hearing/seeing something only really tests short term memory, not true learning. An exercise, rather than a quiz would force engagement, ...


2

This isn't really an answer and requires long term thinking, but perhaps this is an opportunity to start to rethink how we evaluate students. I'm not a big fan of testing. Especially high stakes testing and testing dependent on memorization. Perhaps there is just a better way to determine whether students have mastered the material. I depended much more on ...


2

A good beginning is to see what tooling is already in place at your institution. Rare are the schools which have zero online content. If it's already in use, you have an expert base to draw on. Not knowing how it's grown over the past decade I can only suggest investigation into Blackboard. As a student I found it easy to use and the non-tech teachers ...


1

If you don't mind skipping your own face, your easiest, cheapest option is probably PowerPoint itself. PowerPoint allows you to record audio (and animations) for each slide, set up timing for the next slide to start automatically, and export the entire thing as a video. I'm not aware of any product that both fits criteria 1 (free) and criteria 3 (video of ...


1

Here is what I do in my one-to-one sessions. It can be adapted for group sessions. Both me and the student login (ssh) to a central server (a raspberry pi). From here we can launch Gnu screen to allow us to share a command-line session. We can also launch a VNC server, and both remote connect to it (via ssh). We also use your mobile phones, so we can talk (...


1

At my University, we had the chance to modify the syllabus, if needed, to remove or decrease the weight of "traditional" written tests. While in most programming courses eliminating tests is not a problem, as most of us were already relying mostly on assignments, group works, oral presentations, and so on, there are some courses, were more traditional ...


1

Some options just put the PDFs on the site. runestone — allows you to create interactive webpages, with programming code. sozi — for creating animated slideshows from SVGs. You can generate SVGs from $LaTex$. First use a $Tex$ engine that creates DVIs, then convert the DVIs to SVGs.


1

It sounds like that you want a quick, simple solution to the issue, and while quizlets might not 'maximize learning' they can be quick and simple. I would suggest a quick warmup (i.e., they come in, and five minutes after the bell rings they turn it in, so maybe four quick multiple choice questions and one short response) done on Google forms [since you're ...


1

Yes it is a good idea to review regularly Memory decays over time, but each time in is refreshed, it will last longer. A rule of thumb is to revise after 1 hour, less than a day, ½ week, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 1 year, 10 years, 30 years, then you will never forget. see also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forgetting_curve but how to do it. Non-summative ...


1

I'll address the second part first: These quizzes are meant to make sure students were listening and paying attention. As such, any partially completed quiz indicates partial listening (given that the quiz questions are along the lines of "name one thing/point/property/etc. I mentioned while discussing <some subject covered during the lesson>"). This ...


1

tl;dr: Value student work and universal communication over content. I'm going to add a second answer to discuss a somewhat broader context. I was a pioneer in hybrid courses: partly online and partly face to face. One model was monthly face to face meetings of several hours with most work done remotely. The model assumed round-the-clock work (students lived ...


1

On the Macintosh, at least, the QuickTimePlayer, which is a standard application, has a function to capture the screen as a video, including sound. Having captured one or more videos, you can use any video editing software, which MacOS also provides, to create your lesson. The results can be distributed as you like. I assume that such solutions exist ...


1

We don't use code snapshot tools at Mills because our class sizes are small enough (usually <25) that professors and TAs know how individual students are doing. If students are having trouble, they're likely to email me their own snapshot with a request for help. :-) It sounds like such tools would be useful in larger programs.


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