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I've been using Kotlin for two years now on an introductory course on imperative programming (bachelor's first semester) and I'm very happy with this decision. Before Kotlin, I was using Java for the same course. Here are some of the benefits: No need to explain what are classes on a imperative programming course, since Kotlin programs can only have a main(...


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I think the answer to that depends on how you're structuring the course overall, and what Kotlin brings to the teaching of those ideas. I know of three distinct approaches to an upper-division PL course: the "paradigms" curriculum (à la Sebesta's book), the "interperter/design space" curriculum (EOPL, Scott's "Programming Language Pragmatics", Louden, ...


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What I ended up doing (partly because I didn't have much prep time for me or the students) was using the class period to have pairs of students work together through Kotlin Koans. I walked around pointing out similarities to and differences from other languages we studied. The advantage of this approach was that students got to actively learn parts of the ...


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Just free associating here, actually. The single session of 75 minutes is awfully short to actually have you do anything and then have the students learn anything. So.... First, flip the classroom for that session even if you don't generally. Give them a week (more or less???) to study Kotlin on their own, so that they have some sense about its syntax and ...


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My preferred curriculum is to teach relatively few languages explicitly, but require others in projects, even large projects. Then draw it together in a principles course. Most students in the US come to a CS program knowing some imperative programming, even if they think of it otherwise. But their background is usually very weak and they don't write ...


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