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I would recommend you to rely more on online tutorials. They are updated as fast as the language itself. Buy one good latest book. That will help you set the foundation (not that you cannot set foundation from online tutorials.) I left programming in Java more than 7 years ago but I have still managed to stay up to date on it through OTLs like Pluralsight, ...


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I'll try to give a few actual textbook recommendations. If the goal is to learn Java for regular programming, I would avoid like the plague any Java book that doesn't at least go through Java 5, at which point it practically became a different language. I have always found David Liang to be quite a clear writer, and his most recent text (finally) introduces ...


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The fundamental question is, whether your goal is to learn programming (in which case the language doesn't matter at all … theoretically at least) or to learn Java. If you want to learn programming, the programming language and the version doesn't really matter. It only matters insofar as to understand the examples, and to understand the concepts behind the ...


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For a student, any recent edition will be fine. Don't overthink it. The first task is to become thoroughly familiar with the mental model required of a Java programmer. Or even, for the very experienced, the mental model of a programmer in general. Most, but not all of the recent changes in Java are in the libraries, but even the more fundamental additions ...


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