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2

VisualMelon's answer is a good one; I wanted to extend the suggestion to start on solo projects. Every team sport consists of members who need to both be individually skilled and fit, and work well together as a team. All of these things are hard to learn, and therefore more often than not it is better to learn these one at a time. Therefore, a team is ...


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I would suggest not rushing into trying to contribute unless you have a very willing mentor: I suspect it's relatively unusual for people to contribute to packages/programs that they themselves don't use (indeed, I would be worried if this wasn't the case). That is, if you are not actually consuming any open-source Java packages/programs, then you probably ...


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I'd like to reassure you that if you are accustomed to C++ Java won't be something really difficult to understand. Yeah, it's another language with its peculiarities but nothing enormously hard to cope with. Start from the basics - this rule always works the best. It's OK to be afraid of new things but they are interesting challenges at the same time. ...


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The first thing you need to understand is that your second language is, perhaps the hardest of all to learn. You already know "how to program" and so the second language seems to get in the way of that. Alternatively you just use the second language in the same way you used the first, resulting in ugly and sub-optimal programs. So, you want to ...


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