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1

I took such a class at university. (This was in the 1980s, so most of the classes used some imperative language, at the time the primary languages were PL/I and Pascal, with some FORTRAN and COBOL; but these were in the process of being replaced by Ada and C.) I did find the course to be very enriching, but the students (including me) had already had a ...


1

I teach a high school independent study class that does this but it is a course intended for beginning programming students. The languages are therefore beginner languages. It does give them an intro to an interesting spectrum though. I use code.org (Star Wars or Frozen or Classic Maze), Alice, Small Basic, Thunkable, micro:bit and, depending on the ...


0

Any thoughts or tips from those that might have been down this route before? I see that Prolog is one of the 7 languages and have much experience in Prolog. While I think it is great that Prolog made it into one of the 7, and as I have never looked at the book, I don't think that spending a week on learning Prolog will do the students any good. Most people ...


1

I took a class in programming languages that was absolutely awful. We spent about 3 weeks per paradigm, and had 12-16 hour labs due every week. Each paradigm was different and new, and I couldn't morph my mind around them fast enough. (I was also not that motivated at that particular moment in my life, which certainly didn't help matters.) I have spent ...


9

First, some caveats come to mind. The difference between languages isn't primarily syntax, even languages in the same paradigm family. Once a student has a solid basis of programming in a single language, say Java, they have developed a way of thinking about transformation of problems into solutions. They have ways to assure that their programs are correct ...


2

Rephrasing a language construct is a part of a program that does some special work This is indeed too vague. First of all, every program is built specifically to do a particular job. "Special" is subjective, often synonymous with "custom tailored" and thus any program can be called a "special work". By logical extension, any part of a program is ...


1

A "programming construct" is a sequence of zero or more words and symbols that is legal for the language and also complete. The above mostly works, but not all programming systems are built from words and symbols. One can program graphically, for example. Therefore "sequence" isn't quite right. But it works for the majority of common languages. There are ...


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