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As a student I would find this assignment uninteresting and a waste of my skills. I would feel the professor is just trying to be lazy and not having to properly grade assignments. If they really should know HTML and CSS by now, don't treat them like babies. Just ask them to build a complex responsive page that works as their resume and/or portfolio. They ...


5

Absolute positioning as bad practice Referencing the StackOverflow question, "Is it considered bad practice to use absolute positioning?", the consensus is, just like nearly everything in CSS, "it depends". But let's just throw some data at the topic: More than 50% of website traffic is presumed to be from a mobile device. Using absolute positioning (...


5

I teach game programming, and I have a very similar issue. Day 1: They want to make Overwatch, and on Day 2-End of the year, they want to play overwatch. I usually start the year with an explanation of the parts that go into professional development and then explain that we are only scratching the surface of what is required to develop an AAA game, you ...


5

As Choirbean noted, this is fundamentally a question of motivation. I don't think it's about making something more "exciting." That is, the secret is not in something extrinsic, which is what makes this such a challenging issue whether it be front-end development or really any topic. I draw on Daniel Pink's TED Talk whenever I think about getting students ...


4

I'm not sure how you teach these things, but you may have a misconception about learning that is getting in the way. This seems to be common with newer teachers who don't yet show the scars of many student engagements. I suspect that you see the relationship between theory and practice fairly clearly. So you explain something to students (possibly at a ...


4

Assuming that you have reasonably motivate students in the first place, the first rule of motivation is to explain the goal, and where that fits into a larger framework. So, if you're teaching CSS, you might show the kind of final product that you expect them to be able to make by the end of the course on day 1. You can also explain the limits. Something ...


3

The title here almost feels like a trick question to me. Not that it's intentionally trying to mess with people, but "which one first" is a bit of a false dichotomy. This is a somewhat unfortunate example, but it's the one I was reminded of. Long, long ago, in the ancient history of Stack Overflow, there was a... kinda rude and presumptuous question about a ...


2

I would definitely start with front-end. It's possible to avoid many of the warts of javascript by using ECMA6 or only teaching small pieces of the language. For example, loops and if statements are sane in JS--you don't have to show them the weirdness with == vs. ===. Another reason to start with front-end is that modifying pages by editing the DOM is ...


2

Front end First teach HTML along with inline styles(it is a bad practice though). Because it is very less strict in syntax. You can skip the <head> tag or anything even if you didn't closed the <body> at bottom it show the desired output.(It is a bad practise though) So, when you introduce such a language to students, they will wonder because ...


2

I'd like to summarize a few of the answers already given by suggesting a general framework for such "chicken and egg" problems. You have two things to teach that are closely related but different. You can't really learn one without the other. The solution to such kinds of problems is to use a spiral approach. This is already used to take students through a ...


2

I think there's one step between knowledge of HTML/CSS and writing userscripts: knowledge of Developer Tools in Chrome, especially the "Elements" tab. One demonstration students loved seeing was when I "changed" the school website. I simply right-clicked, selected "Inspect", and modified the text. I had to explain to students that I didn't really change the ...


1

In my client-side dev classes, I start by introducing the HTTP protocol so that the students can understand what really happens when they click one link or type one URL. Then, I start with the flow: Structure (HTML5) - Look (CSS) - Behaviour (JS) They have three assignments which are in fact 3 iterations of the same: the first is the site with only the ...


1

Another element to add to the solution is to slightly delay the HTML tags. You can start with a WYSIWYG web page tool. In that they create the web page that meets your listed objectives. Then you can switch from the visual results into the raw HTML. Using the generated HTML you can demonstrate simple changes to the code that are then visible in the rendered ...


1

There are already answers here. I will add a contrary one, as this point of view is missing. When designing a program, the best ones are the ones where the business logic was designed first. Therefore it is better to design the back-end first. That is get all the processing done. Then output the data, possibly in json. Then think about how it will be ...


1

True full stack from the base install of an OS with an IP address up to the next StackExchange? Multiple classes.. HTML+CSS is always first, then Linux Admin, Back End Coding, and Pure SQL. Only order requirement with the last 3 is that Pure SQL has to be done before Back End Coding, but some of the Linux admin stuff could help with solving issues OR using ...


1

I'll probably elaborate more on this in a blog post at some point but I usually do the following: Simple HTML (load from file, no styling) Simple baclend - I usually use Flask More backend templates programatically making a web page simple forms (GET/POST) Sessions Styling on the front end Using Web APIS Databases Simple JS A whole lot more front end ...


1

Students need at least a cursory understanding of how web pages are built before moving to the back end. Last year we did a project where there were groups split into front end design, front end JS, and backend PHP. The JS and PHP groups weren't able to get started without going back and learning the very basics of HTML. If it were me, I'd probably start ...


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