11

I think you might be underselling your sessions a bit -- understanding how to effectively independently learn is a non-trivial skill that not everybody has mastered, and just being available to facilitate things and answer questions can be very valuable to your students. Having regular sessions that impose some structure and providing a small community of ...


5

I am currently a co-leader of a programming/FIRST club at my high school, and for us the key has been project based learning. We are always working on something. It might not be relevant to our upcoming competition, but we always contextualize lessons in terms of what we're working on. That way everyone stays interested in the current project and sees the ...


4

One approach is to host a contest for your students yourself. You can either 'force' participation by including it in the lesson program or make it extra-curricular, where you can give additional incentive by handing out 'bonus points' to grades for all participating students. For the students that are good enough and enjoy your contest, the contest can ...


4

First of all, kudos to you for being willing to support learning in your community! This is awesome work, and I'm always glad to hear someone is pitching in to help kids learn. I wouldn't be so sure that you're not adding value. There is a principle of teaching that you can use to guide a lot of your action in the classroom: we learn by doing. If the ...


4

Personally, assembling a team (or club etc.) of those students and teach them the relevant material would encourage most (if not all) of them to participate. Also, finding a guide\mentor who can teach them would give the sense of, for lack of a better word, prestige. Here, where I live, there's a national competition and it's very popular, due to the use ...


2

Back in high school, my first programming class was organized like this: The first ~25% of each class was mandatory lecture time. Every student listened to the teacher. This time was used for introducing new topics, going over homework or tests, etc. The second ~25% of each class was optional lecture time. This was for going over stuff in more detail, or ...


2

I am suggesting another idea. Split 60-40 but not in a way as mentioned in the question. Keeping people talk for a day and make the other entire day for programming is quiet boring. Do programming for 2-3 hours, then like a break, conduct the Tech-Talk for an hour or one and half hours. This is the thing actually done by software developers in industry. ...


2

I'm not sure how engaging these would be, but as a source of exercises and practice content, you might look towards IT professional certifications. There are things like A+ (general IT), Networking+, CCNA (Cisco), or MCSA (Microsoft sys admin), among many many exams that are quite popular and have a variety of study resources online. This PCWorld article ...


1

Thank you for taking the initiative to help educate young students who have an interest in programming. Without people to encourage them, many teens who have real potential in the field simply fall through the cracks and end up working in other industries that they aren't so well-suited to. Don't underestimate yourself or your impact on these kids. Even ...


1

Set students tasks inside your lessons that are similar to the Olympiad(or as extension/home tasks for your most able). A good selection come from http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems and http://codingbat.com/python


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