6

If he wants to have a blast biting into some very fun and challenging problems, Project Euler is fantastic, and entirely language neutral. He may find that certain problems are out of his grasp until he learns a bit more programming, but there will be many that will be possible even with what he has. (Arrays, structs, and pointers should make all of the ...


6

Although the question is asking for a book, looking a "Project Euler" mentioned in another answer, I would like to suggest Codewars might be what you are looking for. On codewars you choose your programming language and then you get different levels of problems to solve step by step. You not only test your answer with their built-in testing tool ...


5

The International Olympiad in Informatics is an international competition for gifted young amateur programmers. The tasks from past editions are available online, including detailed problem descriptions, test cases, and test harnesses. While these tasks are described in a way that should be understandable to novice programmers, they are quite challenging and ...


3

Disclaimer 1: I haven't seen the book, and I have no idea what exercises it offers. Disclaimer 2: I haven't seen your brother's code. The goal of an easy exercise is to learn how to write the perfect code. OTOH, the beginner's code tends to be sloppy. For starters, point your brother to the Code Review exchange. When the community is comfortable, let him go ...


3

There are literally zillions of scenarios. Even before the loops are introduced. For example, Min, max, and clipping a value into an interval. Figure out whether a year is a leap one. Determine if a Queen attacks a given square. Solve the quadratic equation in reals (if det < 0:). Calculate the value of a blackjack hand (an ace could be 1 or 11, your ...


2

I have done something similar to this. I've found codingbat to be a great resource. The exercises there are not complex and are structured in a way that later exercises build on previous ones. There are more exercises there for Java than Python but at worst it may be useful for prompting ideas. Now, I have set classroom exercises using some of the ones ...


1

The book by Jeff Erickson, "Algorithms" is a (tough!) next step after getting confortable with the basics.


1

Not exactly exercises, but you learn a lot about programming by working through books like Kernighan and Pike's "The practice of programming" (Addison-Wesley, 1999) and Bentley's "Programming Pearls" (Addison Wesley, 2nd edition 1999). They are not books on any language's syntax, they show how to solve though problems elegantly. Be ...


1

(as promissed in another question, this is my answer) focus only on the starting exercices (I go from 1 to 11) first teach the theory .class, #id, tag, and the selectors for and, or and child (ie p .some_child) Then allow them to to the exercices; and after do them together You can often solve one exercise in multiple ways. While this does not help the ...


1

W3Schools have exercises that go up in small steps that go along with their tutorials https://www.w3schools.com/html/exercise.asp For some project based exercises Raspberry Pi is good and I've used these in the classroom https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/?software[]=html-css-javascript


1

Those problems are usually more in the line of 2 hour work to get it done, so I'd either sample very carefully and/or simplify. For on-line exams the format of an input in a fixed format, no validation needed, and a fixed output is nice (can be graded by test cases). You'll want to add a code review. A generic rubric of mine for programs ran roughly like: ...


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