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1

I would strongly warn against saying anything. You could ask questions to find out why things are like they are. You could note that you dont think your students are where they should be. You could question whether y'all need to make changes to be more effective with the covid style of learning now used. If you could prove that you have ideas that would work ...


2

I would second the recommendation to be cautious. "Newbies", no matter what the field, tend to have more energy, more enthusiasm, and less knowledge of the specific context for curricular decisions and the players and issues involved. It is difficult for people with a strong point of view to present it without sounding arrogant or blinded to ...


2

In thinking about the caveat at the end of my other answer here I have a different tack you might take to make your life better. Rather than trying to mold the students to things that the current projects require and that they will probably learn in the future, why not mold the projects to what the students already know? Life would be easier, though the ...


6

You might not like this answer, but I would be cautious. There could be many reasons why their curriculum is laid out in the way that is. They might be dealing with students of more varied abilities at the start than you think. They might have later coursework that depends upon mastery of the current coursework. They might only have it in place for ...


3

My advice and experience isn't happy here. If this is a temporary position that you don't expect to hold, then it won't matter much, however. And note my caveat after the break below. The only thing you can really do is point out the deficiencies. What competencies would be required of these students for the task at hand and statements that they are poorly ...


0

It has been a long time since this question was asked, but in the meantime, we have begun to incorporate something rather kanban-ish into our senior year capstone course at my school. We did a large-scale curriculum review with industry engineers, students, teachers, guidance counselors, and college professors, and we decided to integrate agile into our ...


-1

How about a boring*, but realistic, commercial example? When the students leave the "hallowed halls" and become entrepreneurs in start-ups, they will be faced with the relationships between Customer, Product, and Sale (Transaction). By keeping all of the Product data (for example) 'together', we introduce the advantage of encapsulation over a basic ...


3

I expect to update this a few times and hope to eventually have a long answer. But let me start by explaining some things that you may already be aware of, but other readers may not. First, OO programming is not, fundamentally, about inheritance and too many books and authors fail to understand that. Moreover, they use inheritance in a dreadful way that ...


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