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I'm happy to stand corrected if someone else comes in with a more experienced answer, but automata and formal languages are typically taught together as two aspects of computational theory, since different sorts of automata represent different sorts of languages. Among other reasons, it's hard to have a discussion about the computing power of modified ...


3

The fundamental element of a computer is a memory cell, which we often refer to as a variable. But what is most important about it is that it can instantly take a new value by being given an electrical input. This is the thing to know, and without knowing that, you know nothing about computers. This is the thing that is a unique feature, different from any ...


2

From my experience: compilers is basically the crown jewel subject where all the others come together. First year you start out with regular languages and finite state automata, and you see how that relates to your basic programming class. In two other classes, you see how propositional logic relates to basic circuit design. Second year, you get into ...


2

I have found that Python is not the best tool for teaching elementary and middle school students an intro to programming. Turtle is nice, but you run out of things to do pretty quickly. If you move on from Turtle to console based coding, many students find it less engaging. Scratch and similar visual languages are much more engaging for younger learners. ...


1

If these kids are true beginners Python is a bit much. Try Scratch or Alice. If you really want a line-code language go for Small Basic. All of these have excellent resources available on their website. Thunkable and App Inventor can also be a good start if you want to try something different.


1

I concur with Bryan R that Turtle might not be a great choice for an in-depth introduction. A quick google search for "python turtle lesson plans" reveals that most plans are for one to three lessons, after which, you have pretty much exhausted what Turtle has to offer. There are various paid resources for Python Turtle at teacherspayteachers. If ...


1

Waldorf / Steiner and Technology Use Waldorf schools aren't against the use of technology in education, they take the stance that introducing technology too early is harmful to natural educational development in students. This quote about Waldorf schools in the UK (where they're also referred to as "Steiner" schools, since Rudolf Steiner pioneered the ...


1

What you suggest is pretty typical for work in a lab. But I assume that you want them to know the package for a reason. You might tailor a few exercises that are related to that purpose so that it is an easy step for them from the lab to the intended use. It is also the sort of thing that might work well with pair programming if they need experience with ...


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Not sure about automatic grading, but you can try this combo: Jupiter as basic infrastructure with the bash_kernel to add support for bash exercises and nbgrader for the grades. I never used nor tested this particular combination, but you can dig a little bit the documentation to check if it works for you.


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The persons who could answer your question best are the students themselves. Why don't you ask them? Seriously though, there might be a host of reasons why a given person is novelty-shy. First of all, however pleasant knowledge might be, any learning process is intrinsically painful, so some reluctance is only to be expected from any pupil or student at ...


1

Assignment is bad This is basically the functional language position. And much of Backus landmark Turing award remains relevant nearly 50 years on. We could rehash those arguments if we wish; but it's good to have something like the Backus TAL as a point of departure for that. Mutation Mutation often looks like assignment but is worse A small Python session ...


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