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Every field has its own key issues and methodologies. History and Literature, for example, are very different from Computer Science. However, it is in the interest of those in other fields to promote computational thinking. It is a skill that their students need and it can be a tool in their own work. However, to do this two things are necessary: First ...


5

I think it's detrimental, to both computer science and education in general, to think of "computing" as a separate topic from the more "traditional" subjects of reading, writing, arithmetic, art, etc. Computer science permeates our lives. It's used in pretty much every subject and every job. And it's not just the surface-level "here's how to use Microsoft ...


4

Building off Bennett Brown's answer about creating an "alphabet" with DNA... It is being researched how to efficiently store data in DNA. Here's some thoughts you can cover: The efficiency of DNA - a vial around the size of your pinky finger can store a petabyte of DNA (see how much is a petabyte? and this fascinating lecture by one of the eminent ...


4

Create a DNA-like representation for the alphabet This activity establishes a background experience that can later be used when teaching that DNA and computer data are sequences of discrete values. Each student picks three colors and creates a 27-character table showing all permutations of "codons" of the colors, akin to the 4^3 DNA codons representing ...


3

Code.org, partnered with Project GUTS, has a CS in Middle School Science curriculum which includes a Life Science Module. This uses StarLogo Nova for modeling and includes unplugged activities as well.


3

Create a phylogenetic tree Pick any human protein. Use NCBI to obtain a 200-500 base pair sequence of mRNA for that protein in homo sapiens. Use NCBI to BLAST that sequence against NCBI database. BLAST is an alignment algorithm. While the supercomputer runs, discuss alignment as a computer science problem. GitHub uses an alignment algorithm to create the ...


3

I would suggest that you start each "session" with each one of you going over what was learnt in the previous session. Devote ~15 mins for it. This is not in spite of the fact that you "don't have a ton of interest in each other's topic", but because of it. This "review" of the last session gives, as I see it: You are exposed to some other field. Who ...


1

Literature class There are a lot of poetry, jokes and literature about computing. Books, plays, film etc These can be good to study, and ask are they like real computers? Why not? What can we learn from them? I, Robot — Isaac Asimov Deep Thought from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy — Douglas Adams ANGEL 1 and ANGEL 2 from earth search — James ...


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