10

Three concrete ideas come to mind based on my experience building a CS program essentially from scratch at the high school level: Have at least one class that has no pre-requisite. We have one intro to programming course that any student can register for, including freshmen. Students don't need any background, any strength in math, any previous AP/Honors/...


9

How should I prevent damage to equipment? Number each piece of equipment, assign each student (or each group of students) a number, and instruct students (or groups of students) to use only their numbered piece of equipment. Explain that each student (or group of students) is responsible for their piece of numbered equipment and they will face punishment if ...


5

Your instinct are dead-on. Students, at least in grades k-12, are not terrifically motivated by what they will "need" in the working world. There are plenty of good reasons for this. First of all, what they will do for their work seems very abstract and far-off. Also, viewed from a vocational lens, there is a quite reasonable shot that they won't ...


4

Some ideas, not all of which may be useful to you: But you need to be aware that the age group is problematic, having little realization of the consequences of their actions. The older students can be expected to behave a bit better, but even those have only the beginnings of adult sensibilities. Find a way to get an assistant. Paid or volunteer. Have ...


4

I'm not a teacher, but based on my experience as a student, I would suggest that you try to show them what they can make out of it or what it does in actual everyday life. Me and most of my classmates were always complaining among ourselves, saying things like: But why do we have to learn it. It's useless and we will forget it by the next week. We were ...


4

There are some good ideas in Peter's answer, but I notice that they all imply or at least come from the perspective of the student being the actor. In many cases, this is just fine. In some other cases, the students may need more of a push, or may need to have some obstacles removed. It has been reported that teachers themselves may try to steer students ...


3

We do most of our work in vampire-mode, i.e. lights-off. Turning the light on for breaks goes a long way towards encouraging students to rest their eyes and stretch. I put a 5-10 minute timer on the projector before every classroom context-switch, so a break doesn't take students by surprise. (It's easy to get lost in this sort of work.) But you can't ...


2

There are many ways to motivate students, but it is a personal, not a group thing. The first thing to keep in mind is that your job is not to deliver material. Wikipedia etc. can do that just fine. You have a different job. Teaching requires a personal relationship between teacher and student Think Socrates and the Socratic method. You need to speak, ...


2

I don't understand all the hate this question is getting. I'm guessing the answers depend on the context a lot. Context of my answer I regularly hold company trainings. Adult education. These are full day IT trainings, that means 9 AM to 5 PM. In the contract we offer 90 minute blocks with 15 minute breaks between and a 45 minute lunch break. Importance ...


2

Breaks? I'm in highschool (not an adult) and I'd be kind of offended if someone told me to go "take a break", especially in an elective - I took this course to learn, not to get told that "sitting is the new smoking". You're wasting their time. (Also, don't assume your students spend their whole day sitting - a not insignificant number of them probably work ...


2

I have a couple thoughts of how I'd handle it: Address it with the bad actors 1-on-1, but don't assume bad faith. We might not know the whole story and there might have been a good reason to walk away from a situation or it is possible that the bad actor has poor social skills. Give them the benefit of the doubt, but explain why that kind of behavior ...


1

First, as Kevin Buffardi pointed out, don't assume bad faith. Poor social skills may be playing a role, and it's also the case that everyone finds people who just rub them the wrong way from time to time. No one is universally liked. Unless you have a strong reason to believe that there is specific vindictiveness or some sort of "-ism" at the heart of the ...


1

This guy's teaching is the best I've ever found on conflict-reducing communication: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Life-Enriching-Education-Communication-Performance-Relationships/dp/1892005050 In summary, keep observations separate from judgments and communicate on the level of needs. Also, empathize first, before expressing yourself.


1

The OP lists "two motivations in life", which perhaps are universal. If someone is interested "because they enjoy it" (reason #1), then that would play out regardless of money being involved, or social support or anything else. This means that the subject is a primary interest. If they are interested "because they have to make a living" (reason #2) then ...


1

First day of class I have this conversation with my students. I ask them if they want to be successful - notice I don't say have a job, or make money. They all respond "of course". Then I go around the room and ask each of them to describe something at which they have become successful and how they achieved success. They all mention hard work, practice, ...


1

If the class isn't too big or too small, you could organize some simple games. You can have a tournament, possibly with prizes. The prize can be as simple as a gold star sticker like the ones elementary school teachers have given out for years. Darts Basketball Free Throws Baseball/beanbag: "hit a target" Frisbee (Ultimate) Make a circle of people and ...


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