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11

Sci/Tech journalism There's a common complaint that people in science journalism, who may have journalism or English academic backgrounds, are okay at writing but vastly underinformed about the computers (or physics, or chemistry, or other subject matter) they're writing about. I've seen it firsthand, and while there are of course exceptions, the complaint ...


10

The kinds of things suggested in your question and many similar things won't help them. Learning some other "tool" or "language" or "technique" at a beginners level will still leave them with just a bunch of tools they don't really know how to use. Instead give them a project - preferably a hard project - in which they can use what they have learned, but ...


8

I don't think this question can be answered in any meaningful way. There isn't a finite list of skills that you need to be a programmer, or that make you a better programmer. Computer science is a huge field encompassing just about every job you can imagine, and each of those jobs requires a different skillset. No matter what your interests are, chances are ...


8

IT jobs tend to require much less in the way of programming skills. A few of these include: System Administrator: keeping a company's servers, desktops, ... operational and secure Network Administrator: keeping a company's network operational and secure Website Administrator: keeping a company's website operational and secure Database Administrator: ...


5

Look at their skills, look at their passion. It they have passion for something, then they will do much better. This passion can not be based on, I think there is money in this. If their passion is Free Software, or systems administration: Then Gnu/Linux. If it is web design, aesthetics, user interaction: Then web design. If it is mobile gaming, or other ...


4

The Technical1 Across the nation, many states have either legislated (or are currently in the process of legislating) mandatory CS instruction, so this is a fantastic time to find a job in CS education. In general, there are two paths into the classroom (at least in the public schools). The first way is to go back to school and get a traditional education ...


4

In many ways the most important reason to choose a profession is that you are driven to it. In many ways the most important characteristic of a good teacher is desire, including a desire to learn. If you have that, it is likely a good choice. My own heart wouldn't let me do anything but teach. This developed pretty early, certainly by my undergraduate days. ...


4

I am answering from the perspective of a recently retired software engineer who worked in a number of Silicon Valley companies from small startups to large corporations with thousands of engineers all over the world. The question seems very broad. I will narrow it down to the one non-programming class in high school that had the biggest positive impact on ...


3

The answer is Yes, but be careful. As far as employment goes, no recruiter is going to want to go through a student's completed homework. Professional Portfolios do NOT include practice However, these students are not professionals. Keeping a website to showcase their practice and skills is good. It's good practice. When these students graduate, the ...


3

What you describe is pretty close to a university professorship. We are paid to learn and teach. We go to conferences and present our work there, as well as work with colleagues. We don't normally have strict no-compete clauses, though teaching for two different universities isn't normally allowed. Courses we develop can be used by others in many cases, ...


3

If you are doing a good job of teaching then your students probably think you are smarter than you really are. They may also think that you arrived magically at your current position without effort or setback. It is good for them to know the truth. That what looks to them like brilliance was more likely just hard work and never giving up. It is also good ...


3

Other specialties that are in demand and need a good CS background but not just programming (but having some programming skills helps) Performance Engineer Devops/Automation Engineer QA (Test engineer, maybe tied to automation, build, devops) Security Engineer data/database specialist (non-sql, sql, cloud object store,distributed file systems), Data ...


3

Well first, get a bachelor's degree in CS. Then it depends on the student's goals: Work in industry first. The job outlook for computer science graduates is bright. Salaries are high too. Get a full-time, then go back and teach part-time. I know someone who teaches high school full-time and works part-time in the afternoons. He's very busy, so it's not for ...


2

I just noticed that most of the answers here, while good, don't answer the originators question: How can I .... My suggestions, all of which are hard work: If you don't have a "club" for your majors start one so they can talk about issues guided by yourself and others you invite. Even if the club is mostly technical, have a "career night" occasionally. ...


2

One suggestion would be to find a job at a private school where it is more likely that they will not have to have a teaching certification. If they enjoy their time there, then I would suggest becoming certified, if only to make themselves more easily employed by public schools in the future. There are public schools that will hire a teacher with the ...


2

Essential Web - HTML, CSS, Javascript and jQuery. - This is something that is a basic requirement for a lot of jobs where I live. I also believe this is something anybody can learn, even if they are short on time. Java (with Android) - Learn to build an app. Android is pretty straight forward, and does not really require a thorough knowledge of Java itself....


2

Off course it is a broad question and depends totally on the: Student's Interest Student's Aptitude Checking whether that tool/domain has some scope - Say someone wants to work in VB, then I would have really think about it. This survey can serve as a good measure but a word of precaution is needed to check the demography of participants to compare it with ...


2

My opinion is that Essential Web is the way to go in this specific situation. 1. It is clearly employable. I'm inferring from the post that at least one of the motivations of the students in question is to be as employable as possible. When I look at the 3 options presented, I feel like Essential Web is the most generally employable. Also, while I haven't ...


2

We can't help you find a topic. You must focus yourself on a single point of entry. There are already high-quality, pre-arranged curriculums available in every topic at a high level, and they are called textbooks. See if you can find one that is an introduction to the field that you're looking at. You might be surprised at how close of a match you can ...


2

I am glad to see your question, because 40 years ago, I was a child who was extremely interested in electronics, radio and computers, and the resources seemed much more limited then. I would say, because the field is so broad, it does not matter where you start. Pick something that interests you and go as far as you can with it. My first interest was in ...


2

One particularly nice, if a bit flashy, suggestion a supervisor once gave me for students to showcase their work is to build a phone or watch app. That way when an employer asks "what can you do for us?" you simply whip out a phone app, hand it to them, and say "there you go". Perhaps not so brazenly, but you get the point!


2

Portfolios should answer two questions: What is this person capable of? What is this person interested in? And the answers to those questions should be as obvious as possible. I should see at a glance specific examples of what you're capable of and interested in. A portfolio should highlight specific examples of stuff you're good at, and stuff you want to ...


2

First, yes, portfolios are a universally good thing for students at any level, not just high school. My preference is to require them and also to provide some institutional support for their creation and maintenance. The initial creation of the portfolio can be a project for a second or third year student - graded or not. If there is a course in web ...


2

As well as those (what are sometime referred to as soft) skills. I would say that there are other skills that are needed to be a good programmer. Not all of these would I expect to see in a graduate. However I would expect to see some. Gnu/Linux / Unix skills. Revision control. Agile. Software Project management (most project management courses teach ...


1

Centuries ago (1978) I saw a graph in Creative Computing. It was the cost of writing a line of code divided by the cost of executing it and realised there was good money to be had there. We were as poor as UK people get and programming, unlike the media, isn't determined by how pretty you are or in the case of the BBC who you are related to, the colour of ...


1

tl;dr: Encourage them to start putting together their own personal portfolio webpages. Tell them to create a webpage that showcases projects they've worked on. Don't know how to create a webpage? Now is a perfect time to learn! Then build from there. Was there a project they were particularly interested in? Expand on that, make improvements, make it ...


1

I'm going to be honest - I'd question them first. Maybe suggest tutoring to see if they like it, and really trying to get at what they want to do. If they want to teach at a university and also do research, that's one thing. If they want to teach at a highschool or middle school, that's quite another. An example: I've emailed a professor at a university ...


1

A CS graduate with good writing and people skills might want to look into entry level product or project management positions. Adding a few business management courses might help with that.


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