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I can't tell whether I've missed something in the other answers or comments, but the natural language equivalent of XOR is to ask "is there any difference?" Used in a sentence which follows the broad format of those in the question, you'd be saying something like "the light is on differs-from the door is open", with the compound 'differs-from' element ...


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Let me give a not-answer that may be just about as valuable as an answer. Natural language is ambiguous. Many uses of or in natural language have an xor intent. Your intention, I expect, is to make the lesson clear that the meaning of these two computing operators isn't the same. It may actually be more dramatic if you use examples that explore the ...


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The more I think about this, the more that I'm convinced that the or doesn't independently carry the weight of exclusivity in any circumstance outside of choices, and that any exclusivity has to be provided by context of two options that can't coexist. But the key problem with this for the CS teacher is that in those circumstances, having two true inputs ...


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Say I’ve got two coins. They can each take on two states (heads or tails). Flip em both; xor can tell you if they are different (not-equal). The name has exclusive in it because when xor is yes/1/true, the heads are exclusive. That is, one head excludes the other. This is also true for the tails.


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Experimental Approach This is based on the example given by candied_orange, which I found intriguing because of its simplicity. The example was (slightly edited here): Say I’ve got two coins. They can each take on two states (heads or tails). Flip em both; xor can tell you if they show different states (not-equal coin sides). This hypothesis can be ...


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Here's an example - A 2 way switch Both 'up' / both 'down' == off Single 'down' == on So, in English, one can perhaps say, "The light is on if switch A is down xor switch B is down"


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This was fun! Here are three, and I will update as I think of more: You may go on the symphony trip if you are in the music history class or if you are not enrolled in any arts class this semester. You want to find people for your cliff-climbing trip? You're in the wrong place. Ask around in the groups that took the jogging or bike trips up the mountain ...


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