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8

Microcontrollers can address two important aspects. The first is bridging the gap between the code, and the real world. Particularly if you have sensors (accelerometer, buttons) and outputs (an LED array, sound, motors). Not just to address the robotics aspect (which can rapidly get complex), but some simple game concepts (patterns, reactions). Nothing ...


5

If the goal is to create more interest in learning programming (as you state above), then Arduinos are not the strongest vehicles for reaching that end. The logic of void setup() and void loop() are not immediately accessible nor intuitive to a student brand new to programming. For one who is experienced and/or is inclined toward mechanical/electrical ...


4

My preferred lesson, using any board that has servo headers (and you can do it even without these), is to show them how to make a servo turn (I have a wheel attached to it ahead of time). The program is fairly easy to follow for students, and there is a look of shock when it starts moving. I then tell them that they need to attach the servo along with ...


2

HD44780. Classic 1, 2 or 4 line LCD alphanumeric displays. The protocol is simple, getting these to work perfectly in practice is gritty (the way similar looking displays can have very different visible address space breaks etc will teach problem solving). Best get a grab bag of all kinds of sundry displays based on that chip. Have someone (can be students) ...


1

This sounds a little bit like an X-Y problem. When you're using micro controllers in a computer science class, what is it that you're trying to teach? How to write a for/while loop to satisfy an abstract line of pseudo-code, or the joy of making yourself something that previously you have only seen as an expensive gimmick in a shop? I think there are ...


1

Advantages compared to what? I will assume compared to programming abstract applications on a desktop. Programming abstract applications on a microcontroller does not provide any obvious advantages, beyond teaching students what a microcontroller is. You get advantages when it comes to what I call "Applied Programming". On a desktop, it's difficult (but ...


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