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Back around 1985, Susan Merritt created an Inverted Taxonomy of Sorting Algorithms. The idea is that to sort an array you have two phases, the split phase and the join phase. She divided the various algorithms into two types easy split/hard join and hard split/easy join varieties. Merge sort is of the former type. Quick sort is the latter. But all sorts, ...


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The simplest example that still bears enough complexity to show what's going on is probably merge sort. It's no coincidence that this algorithm is the classical example to begin explaining the divide and conquer technique. I am not sure at what level you teach, but your students should be comfortable with both recursion and inductive proofs before venturing ...


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First, if you aren't taking a course, get a good book that has a lot of exercises. Use the exercises to guide your learning. Try to find a way to get some feedback on your attempts. The way you learn just about anything deeply is to get a lot of reinforcement and feedback. On the other hand, it is seldom necessary with today's languages and libraries to ...


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