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The curriculum of a Computer Science course is a sequence of planned subjects that the students will be taught in the course. This tag should be used for questions asking for guidance on designing parts of that sequence, the entire sequence or questions related to the preferred order in which to teach subjects. Question relating to a single lesson should NOT receive this tag.

7
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5answers
In creating a general introductory course on computers or computing (programming and/or CS), does one mostly present high level concepts (recursion, computational complexity, concurrency, etc.), pract …
asked Jul 22 '17 by hotpaw2
20
votes
11answers
Should ye ole' fashioned assembly language be taught to help students develop a sense of how actual underlying computational hardware supports/allows running their higher-level or more abstract softwa …
asked May 23 '17 by hotpaw2
4
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I am of the school of thinking that starting at an abstract level causes too many students to consider computation as inscrutable magic. And that can lead to broken mental models and buggy ideas abou …
answered Jul 20 '17 by hotpaw2
5
votes
4answers
Why do some instructors delay teaching mutation due to considering it to be a more difficult concept? (than functional or recursive concepts, etc.) It is very likely that, back in the 8-bit PC days, …
asked Jul 20 '17 by hotpaw2
-1
votes
IIRC, my shop and chemistry classes included mandatory safety briefings. Many educational institutions have a code-of-conduct with which students are supposed to know and comply. The same should hap …
answered Aug 8 '17 by hotpaw2
1
vote
The computing ecosystem keeps making smaller and smaller things. Imperative programming is far better matched to Arduinos and other small cheap computers that a k12 and earlier student is likely to t …
answered May 16 '18 by hotpaw2
0
votes
Client side first allows students to get simple stuff running using a smaller number of required concepts and steps. So it's probably a lower cognitive load to getting most people started.
answered May 23 '17 by hotpaw2
-1
votes
The HS curriculum of PLtW appears to use the Python programming language. Python can be learned and used from a command-line plus text editor, with zero graphics, which is good for screen readers.
answered Sep 1 '17 by hotpaw2
2
votes
A touch of some minimal explanation of logic gates, binary numbers, state machines and the processor-memory divide helps make computing seem less like magic, and more like technology (something of whi …
answered Jun 18 '17 by hotpaw2
3
votes
Teach them to use jump statements (but only within suitable contexts). Jumps are perfectly normal in assembly language, machine code, and state machines (Turing machine advance tape by N). Teach jum …
answered Jun 12 '17 by hotpaw2