Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 1293

This tag is for questions related to both data abstraction/encapsulation in general and for the usage of the various data structures provided by language or built by programmers. Stack and Queue are classic examples.

30
votes
There is one aspect not yet mentioned, though the first two answers are excellent. Libraries usually contain only the most common data structures and those that can be used in some generic way (pun …
answered Apr 26 '18 by Buffy
2
votes
One classic type of problem is handling communications - especially asynchronous communications from multiple sources. That may be a bit much in an elementary course if you want to mostly avoid race c …
answered May 21 by Buffy
3
votes
tl;dr Build the layers with appropriate scaffolding, either top-down or bottom-up. The goal is to understand an abstraction layer architecture. The teaching method is to have students build it laye …
answered Jul 26 '17 by Buffy
2
votes
The key to learning this, or much of anything, is reinforcement and feedback. Reinforcement comes from doing exercises and solving problems in a course like this and the book has plenty of mid chapter …
answered Sep 11 by Buffy
3
votes
While uniform collections are the obvious example, you can also build or use a Pair class in which the types of the two components are given by generic arguments. If you don't want to build it, there …
answered Oct 5 '18 by Buffy
4
votes
Yes, you should at least introduce the idea to your students. That said, it is also a truism of education that you need not explain every concept at the same level of detail. In this particular case …
answered Jan 23 '18 by Buffy
4
votes
Sorry, but digging in your heels or telling the students to wake the hell up is going to get you exactly nowhere. When a small percentage of your students fail to successfully complete a project it is …
answered Oct 9 '18 by Buffy
3
votes
First, if you aren't taking a course, get a good book that has a lot of exercises. Use the exercises to guide your learning. Try to find a way to get some feedback on your attempts. The way you lear …
answered Jul 16 by Buffy
0
votes
This will be mostly just caveats and things to think about. One problem you will have is that the original code and some other versions are all online as open source. It will be hard to keep your st …
answered Oct 17 '18 by Buffy
1
vote
This answer is a supplement to those of BenI. and ctrl-alt-delor, with a specific suggestion. Call it an implementation strategy. Your problem is that the topic is broad, with lots of parts. You can …
answered Oct 13 '17 by Buffy
2
votes
Markov Chains are great for putting out nonsense based on statistical data. However, a predictive keyboard that outputs nonsense isn't very useful. It needs much more context than a Markov Chain can p …
answered Jun 13 '18 by Buffy