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To give another perspective, when teaching an intro to web development course it's very useful to teach things in a way similar to how they were discovered and contextualize the different concepts in history. It's easy to understand why HTML is a markup language rather than a full fledged language when you consider the time: The Web was used for serving plain text pages, and they wanted a little markup to make it nicer. HTML was born. When styling become larger than HTML could encompass, CSS was born. When interactions wanted to be built in, JS was born, etc. Otherwise you can get into extended discussions about why the front-end environment is the way it is.

I would guess that this sense of parallels between the order in which things are invented and the order in which things are taught exists in other fields as well, and so teaching history along with the normal coursework could be very useful.