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Hi I am looking for the resource for teaching the command line, the file system for high school student. I find some students have little idea of what the file system, not to mention navigating the file system using cd/pwd/ls

The materials I have investigated include "The Linux command line for beginners" and "Learn Enough Command Line to Be Dangerous"

But I feel them are a bit complicated for high school students. I like "The Linux command line for beginners" but I often get sidetracked by spending time explaining linux (which is another big topic) when most kids use Windows.

So any recommendation (book included) for teaching those stuff ? In a way my question is related to How to teach the value of the command line in high school?

--- update ---

From the comments I got so far I am updating my question to make my objective more clearly. First I want to them to learn some command lines. Even most kids are using Windows, it is easy to find information like Windows and Unix command line equivalents, e.g. check here and here

With WSL I have assumed it won't be too hard to learn unix/linux commands on windows but I have not tried yet. So the hard question maybe is to let them know what benefit(s) of learning command lines.

I think having some basic knowledge of the file system is also important. Learning CLI will be also inevitable to expose some concept of fs to them. So I put them together when I asked the question.

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    $\begingroup$ IMHO you are asking two different questions. 1. How to use the command line. 2. How the file system works and how to navigate it. The first is hard, the second is easier. $\endgroup$
    – Guy Coder
    Oct 9 at 13:11
  • $\begingroup$ If you just want them to know enough to be functional then a reference book might be better as it force them to read all of the nitty gritty details. Unless I am working with Bash scripts I really don't do more than use a few man(ual) pages. When I read or write Bash I try to avoid pulling my hair out. There is a big gap between the two needs. $\endgroup$
    – Guy Coder
    Oct 9 at 13:14
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    $\begingroup$ What exactly are your overall objectives? To learn how to use Unix/Linux' command line when they only know/use Windows is useless (in the day to day), so it will be very hard to get the point across. They'll learn by using, not by looking at presentations or reading books. $\endgroup$
    – vonbrand
    Oct 9 at 16:53
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    $\begingroup$ If you were teaching students to drive a car, would you expound on "benefits of learning gas pedal?" I think you could set a higher-level goal. E.g., Use command-line tools to compile, and link, and run a simple command-line program. As far as "resources" go, I don't think you'd need much more than a one-page "cheat sheet," and maybe another page of ideas to try at home. As for benefits: Those same compile and link commands can be scripted. If you use an IDE, or an automated build tool, they may actually be scripted somewhere within its configuration files. $\endgroup$ Oct 12 at 1:48
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    $\begingroup$ Actually it was when I taught them to compile some c files that I found they had little idea of command line & fs. $\endgroup$ Oct 12 at 1:55
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Although the intended audience is graduate students, maybe the Software Carpentry Unix Shell lesson is useful?

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I have a video series on using UNIX on YouTube. It is here. This is useful for Mac/Linux users or if your students log onto a server to program at the command line (they should have this experience).

Also, if you are a windows user, you can enable your BASH subsystem. You then have a UNIX shell on your windows box.

Alumni tell me that command-line skill is still highly valued.

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