4
$\begingroup$

I'm doing a coding workshop and I can't seem to find a good way to stream a part of my screen (or some windows in my screen) into a projector. I only need the code editor and terminal/command prompt windows to show to the students. I didn't want to mirror my screen since I have slide notes and reminders only for me (as the presenter). So what I was thinking is to extend my screen into a projector (or to simulate, a second screen), and have a software streaming (mirroring) a part of my orig. screen into that second screen.

This is so the students can see what I'm typing into the code editor and terminal. I also have slides that I want to be in that projected screen.

But I still need a part of my orig. screen hidden for my notes.

I used VLC to stream desktop but it's a pain to setup and there is some lag into the stream.

The description may sound confusing but you could imagine just what you would do if you have three things to show to the students. Your code editor, terminal and your slides. But you also have slide notes and some other notes for yourself.

Any good ideas?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Could you share some more information about the setup that you are rigging yourself into? $\endgroup$ – Ben I. Oct 6 '18 at 17:44
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This sounds like the inverse of a conversation I had a couple of years back. I was demonstrating a hardware solution, and he kept asking what software I was using (it was PowerPoint). Your circumstance calls for a hardware solution. $\endgroup$ – pojo-guy Oct 7 '18 at 3:58
  • $\begingroup$ I do this by setting the project as a second monitor as a "second monitor" and extending the desktop, then simply scoot my editor/ide/terminal window over. Of course, this also means I have to increase the font, etc. but hey, if I can't see it on the screen, neither can my students. $\endgroup$ – ivanivan Oct 18 '18 at 19:57
2
$\begingroup$

I work on a Macintosh, but assume similar capabilities are available on other systems as well. My systems support multiple monitors and each monitor can show a separate desktop (or a section of a larger desktop). A window in one desktop can simply be dragged to another. If you just connect your regular monitor to one (physical or virtual) port and the projector to another, you will have what you want. If you don't have physical ports a junction/splitter may be required to support the multiple monitors so long as the software will support it.

You could, possibly, have two monitors and a projector with the projector mirroring one of the monitors so as to make your own workflow easier.

This assumes, of course, that you are interested in a face-to-face situation, not remote students.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This would actually work. I would just have to make sure I'll have another screen at the venue. The other reason I need the streaming software is that I wanted to face the audience while I'm typing in my screen. Since typing directly into the projected screen would be awkward and hard. $\endgroup$ – squidwardprops02 Oct 6 '18 at 15:47
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Use a quad video card, one output for your main screen, then two (mirroring each other) for the presentation view. One of the mirrored outputs goes to a monitor facing you, the other goes to the projector. You can do whatever you want with the 4th output. $\endgroup$ – pojo-guy Oct 7 '18 at 1:21
2
$\begingroup$

I used to project from a computer with two monitors. One was mine, and had whatever I didn't want the students to see. The second was mirrored to the projector so anything I wanted them to see would show up. I'd also run Adobe Connect on that screen so that students could pull up the projected stuff on their own screens. Kept them from having to turn their heads to see what was going on.

This year I have a notebook that I use for presenting, and that's it. One of the flaws with having dual monitors (they were both 24") was that the monitors blocked my view of students. It made it harder to see confused faces or students that weren't doing what they were supposed to be doing. Now, with just a 14" notebook screen in the way it's easier to get a feel for how the students are following along.

I've also used a program called OBS for the past couple of years. I use it to record my demos, but it'll also stream directly to YouTube and Twitch. It'll let you select which windows to share if you don't want to share the whole screen.

Your code editor, terminal and your slides.

I use multiple desktops on Windows 10 for this. Each thing gets its own desktop and I switch between with Ctrl-Windows-Left (or right). Then I can switch between them pretty easily.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.