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I teach an introductory Scratch class to a group of elementary-school students. Most of the focus is on having fun creating simple games, but i still try to introduce a little higher-level programming as well, so that they have the tools when they decide they need them.

What are some relatively easy games that require using a list that i can assign them?
Ideally it should be something that can be done in an hour-long lesson.

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closed as too broad by Aurora0001, Ben I., thesecretmaster, Henry WH Hack v2.1.3, Peter May 26 '17 at 0:07

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ I think there are probably hundreds of games that would use lists; I'm not sure whether it's practical to fit these options in the Stack Exchange format. Do you have any specific game types in mind, or additional constraints to limit the answer set a bit? $\endgroup$ – Aurora0001 May 25 '17 at 14:43
  • $\begingroup$ @Aurora0001 Well, i specifically ask for "relatively easy games". I can try and narrow it down a bit more. $\endgroup$ – Scimonster May 25 '17 at 14:48
  • $\begingroup$ I'm sure you can imagine there are hundreds of ideas that could meet that criteria; perhaps including the tasks that you've set so far would help so that answers can get a clearer picture of what might be useful to you, rather than a big list of every game that could possibly use a list, which probably won't help you so much. $\endgroup$ – Aurora0001 May 25 '17 at 14:51
  • $\begingroup$ We've started a discussion about this question on meta here. $\endgroup$ – Ben I. May 25 '17 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ @Scimonster I think it would be useful to try and narrow the question based on the answers so far and the meta discussion - with the aim of re-opening. $\endgroup$ – Sean Houlihane Jun 4 '17 at 15:54
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A variant on the usual random drill and practice test would be to pre-populate with the questions and answers, then remove question and answer from each as they get answered correctly, allowing players to get more practice on the questions they get wrong. Here's an example for times tables.

You could try something for an adventure game, building up an inventory of items collected in a list. Another possibility would be an adaptive 20 questions style game, adding additional questions into a database (of sorts) as the player gets to the end of a branch of the tree.

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You could create a spelling game where the set words get increasingly more difficult. The words will be stored as a list and a loop is used to cycle through the words as they answer the questions.

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    $\begingroup$ Linking the words to an audio recording of each, see e.g. $\endgroup$ – Miles May 25 '17 at 9:43

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