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How can I get through very long and very dry, but also very useful technical documents when learinglearning a new tool?

Vulkan is a very useful API for rendering projects, and I would like to learn how to use it as it opens up new possibilities for doing some rendering tricks much more efficiently than in OpenGl.

I am having significant trouble learning it, however. It is a very complex API with many essential details. These details, while useful, are not interesting enough in and of themself to reliably hold my attention for long periods, even if I put in significant effort. I find when I go through the written tutorials that I get very distracted by almost anything. 

For example, when I was reading about its mechanism for selecting a GPU in a multi-GPU system instead of focusing on the syntax that I want to learn, I ended up thinking about all the implications of such a selection existing, compared to the fact that it does not in OpenGl. Distractions such as that end up drastically increasing the time that I need to spend on the reading, and skimming is not an option either as the details really are important. 

There are also diminishing returns as my ability to use will power to remain focused diminishes much more quickly than I would like it to (I can only get through maybe ~10 pages of this reading in a single sitting while maintaining the focus that I feel is necessary.)

This problem is not unique to Vulkan. I had the same problem, but to a much lesser extent, when learning OpenGl. In that instance, I was able to find video tutorials that explained the necessary concepts very succinctly. This helped both because the explanations were more succinct, with only the necessary information (including theory when appropriate) to use the API (and I could look at written alternatives when I wanted more details). 

When I attempted this for Vulkan, however, the only video tutorials that I could find were both outdated and contradictingcontradicted the text tutorials in a few places, making me very weary of using them as I may pick up bad practices or outdated Vulkan. Video tutorials also work well for me as they keep on moving even if I get temporarily distracted, thus pulling my attention back. When reading, if I get distracted I automatically stop reading.

I would also like to note that this isn't an issue of lazyness; I am willing to put in significant time to do it, but I find that my ability to focus is quickly diminishing.

As such, I ask: How can I learn Vulkan (Ideally, the advice will be applicable to other similar tasks as well) reasonably efficiently and how can I counter the described road-blocks?

How can I get through very long and very dry, but also very useful technical documents when learing a new tool?

Vulkan is a very useful API for rendering projects, and I would like to learn how to use it as it opens up new possibilities for doing some rendering tricks much more efficiently than in OpenGl.

I am having significant trouble learning it, however. It is a very complex API with many essential details. These details, while useful, are not interesting enough in and of themself to reliably hold my attention for long periods, even if I put in significant effort. I find when I go through the written tutorials that I get very distracted by almost anything. For example, when I was reading about its mechanism for selecting a GPU in a multi-GPU system instead of focusing on the syntax that I want to learn, I ended up thinking about all the implications of such a selection existing, compared to the fact that it does not in OpenGl. Distractions such as that end up drastically increasing the time that I need to spend on the reading, and skimming is not an option either as the details really are important. There are also diminishing returns as my ability to use will power to remain focused diminishes much more quickly than I would like it to (I can only get through maybe ~10 pages of this reading in a single sitting while maintaining the focus that I feel is necessary.)

This problem is not unique to Vulkan. I had the same problem, but to a much lesser extent, when learning OpenGl. In that instance, I was able to find video tutorials that explained the necessary concepts very succinctly. This helped both because the explanations were more succinct, with only the necessary information (including theory when appropriate) to use the API (and I could look at written alternatives when I wanted more details). When I attempted this for Vulkan, however, the only video tutorials that I could find were both outdated and contradicting the text tutorials in a few places, making me very weary of using them as I may pick up bad practices or outdated Vulkan. Video tutorials also work well for me as they keep on moving even if I get temporarily distracted, thus pulling my attention back. When reading, if I get distracted I automatically stop reading.

I would also like to note that this isn't an issue of lazyness; I am willing to put in significant time to do it, but I find that my ability to focus is quickly diminishing.

As such, I ask: How can I learn Vulkan (Ideally, the advice will be applicable to other similar tasks as well) reasonably efficiently and how can I counter the described road-blocks?

How can I get through very long and very dry, but also very useful technical documents when learning a new tool?

Vulkan is a very useful API for rendering projects, and I would like to learn how to use it as it opens up new possibilities for doing some rendering tricks much more efficiently than in OpenGl.

I am having significant trouble learning it, however. It is a very complex API with many essential details. These details, while useful, are not interesting enough in and of themself to reliably hold my attention for long periods, even if I put in significant effort. I find when I go through the written tutorials that I get very distracted by almost anything. 

For example, when I was reading about its mechanism for selecting a GPU in a multi-GPU system instead of focusing on the syntax that I want to learn, I ended up thinking about all the implications of such a selection existing, compared to the fact that it does not in OpenGl. Distractions such as that end up drastically increasing the time that I need to spend on the reading, and skimming is not an option either as the details really are important. 

There are also diminishing returns as my ability to use will power to remain focused diminishes much more quickly than I would like it to (I can only get through maybe ~10 pages of this reading in a single sitting while maintaining the focus that I feel is necessary.)

This problem is not unique to Vulkan. I had the same problem, but to a much lesser extent, when learning OpenGl. In that instance, I was able to find video tutorials that explained the necessary concepts very succinctly. This helped both because the explanations were more succinct, with only the necessary information (including theory when appropriate) to use the API (and I could look at written alternatives when I wanted more details). 

When I attempted this for Vulkan, however, the only video tutorials that I could find were both outdated and contradicted the text tutorials in a few places, making me very weary of using them as I may pick up bad practices or outdated Vulkan. Video tutorials also work well for me as they keep on moving even if I get temporarily distracted, thus pulling my attention back. When reading, if I get distracted I automatically stop reading.

I would also like to note that this isn't an issue of lazyness; I am willing to put in significant time to do it, but I find that my ability to focus is quickly diminishing.

As such, I ask: How can I learn Vulkan (Ideally, the advice will be applicable to other similar tasks as well) reasonably efficiently and how can I counter the described road-blocks?

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How can I get through very drylong and very dry, but also very useful technical documents when learing a new tool?

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How can I get through very dry and very dry, but also very useful technical documents when learing a new tool?

Vulkan is a very useful API for rendering projects, and I would like to learn how to use it as it opens up new possibilities for doing some rendering tricks much more efficiently than in OpenGl.

I am having significant trouble learning it, however. It is a very complex API with many essential details. These details, while useful, are not interesting enough in and of themself to reliably hold my attention for long periods, even if I put in significant effort. I find when I go through the written tutorials that I get very distracted by almost anything. For example, when I was reading about its mechanism for selecting a GPU in a multi-GPU system instead of focusing on the syntax that I want to learn, I ended up thinking about all the implications of such a selection existing, compared to the fact that it does not in OpenGl. Distractions such as that end up drastically increasing the time that I need to spend on the reading, and skimming is not an option either as the details really are important. There are also diminishing returns as my ability to use will power to remain focused diminishes much more quickly than I would like it to (I can only get through maybe ~10 pages of this reading in a single sitting while maintaining the focus that I feel is necessary.)

This problem is not unique to Vulkan. I had the same problem, but to a much lesser extent, when learning OpenGl. In that instance, I was able to find video tutorials that explained the necessary concepts very succinctly. This helped both because the explanations were more succinct, with only the necessary information (including theory when appropriate) to use the API (and I could look at written alternatives when I wanted more details). When I attempted this for Vulkan, however, the only video tutorials that I could find were both outdated and contradicting the text tutorials in a few places, making me very weary of using them as I may pick up bad practices or outdated Vulkan. Video tutorials also work well for me as they keep on moving even if I get temporarily distracted, thus pulling my attention back. When reading, if I get distracted I automatically stop reading.

I would also like to note that this isn't an issue of lazyness; I am willing to put in significant time to do it, but I find that my ability to focus is quickly diminishing.

As such, I ask: How can I learn Vulkan (Ideally, the advice will be applicable to other similar tasks as well) reasonably efficiently and how can I counter the described road-blocks?