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Buffy's answer is already spot-on, but here's another $0.02.

We would take on any willing instructors with backgrounds in coding that would be able to use the students as a means of developing their personal projects, while simultaneously teaching them how to code. Everyone benefits.

I think you're vastly underestimating how much work it is to delegate tasks, to bundle those tasks up in a format that another person can approach, and to generally manage other people. It's also very difficult to deal with time management (or lack thereof), and to manage expectations (and decide what happens when expectations are not met).

You're asking instructors (who are already extremely busy) to work as program managers, for free, on projects staffed by people who are going to need a ton of hands-on help. There is a huge time cost here.

You've basically just described an internship, and generally both parties are paid for their time. If you aren't planning on paying the people involved, then I'm afraid you aren't going to see many volunteers.

Your heart sounds like it's in the right place though, so I'd recommend doing another round of brainstorming. The best advice I can give you is to start smaller. You

For example, you might rethink your project to be something more like a way to connect students to open-source projects looking for help. This question has a bunch of resources you might want to check out.

Buffy's answer is already spot-on, but here's another $0.02.

We would take on any willing instructors with backgrounds in coding that would be able to use the students as a means of developing their personal projects, while simultaneously teaching them how to code. Everyone benefits.

I think you're vastly underestimating how much work it is to delegate tasks, to bundle those tasks up in a format that another person can approach, and to generally manage other people. It's also very difficult to deal with time management (or lack thereof), and to manage expectations (and decide what happens when expectations are not met).

You're asking instructors (who are already extremely busy) to work as program managers, for free, on projects staffed by people who are going to need a ton of hands-on help. There is a huge time cost here.

You've basically just described an internship, and generally both parties are paid for their time. If you aren't planning on paying the people involved, then I'm afraid you aren't going to see many volunteers.

Your heart sounds like it's in the right place though, so I'd recommend doing another round of brainstorming. The best advice I can give you is to start smaller. You might rethink your project to be something more like a way to connect students to open-source projects looking for help. This question has a bunch of resources you might want to check out.

Buffy's answer is already spot-on, but here's another $0.02.

We would take on any willing instructors with backgrounds in coding that would be able to use the students as a means of developing their personal projects, while simultaneously teaching them how to code. Everyone benefits.

I think you're vastly underestimating how much work it is to delegate tasks, to bundle those tasks up in a format that another person can approach, and to generally manage other people. It's also very difficult to deal with time management (or lack thereof), and to manage expectations (and decide what happens when expectations are not met).

You're asking instructors (who are already extremely busy) to work as program managers, for free, on projects staffed by people who are going to need a ton of hands-on help. There is a huge time cost here.

You've basically just described an internship, and generally both parties are paid for their time. If you aren't planning on paying the people involved, then I'm afraid you aren't going to see many volunteers.

Your heart sounds like it's in the right place though, so I'd recommend doing another round of brainstorming. The best advice I can give you is to start smaller.

For example, you might rethink your project to be something more like a way to connect students to open-source projects looking for help. This question has a bunch of resources you might want to check out.

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source | link

Buffy's answer is already spot-on, but here's another $0.02.

We would take on any willing instructors with backgrounds in coding that would be able to use the students as a means of developing their personal projects, while simultaneously teaching them how to code. Everyone benefits.

I think you're vastly underestimating how much work it is to delegate tasks, to bundle those tasks up in a format that another person can approach, and to generally manage other people. It's also very difficult to deal with time management (or lack thereof), and to manage expectations (and decide what happens when expectations are not met).

You're asking instructors (who are already extremely busy) to work as program managers, for free, on projects staffed by people who are going to need a ton of hands-on help. There is a huge time cost here.

You've basically just described an internship, and generally both parties are paid for their time. If you aren't planning on paying the people involved, then I'm afraid you aren't going to see many volunteers.

Your heart sounds like it's in the right place though, so I'd recommend doing another round of brainstorming. The best advice I can give you is to start smaller. You might rethink your project to be something more like a way to connect students to open-source projects looking for help. This question has a bunch of resources you might want to check out.