3 Adding a bit more amplification on the question.
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When working to teach developers Scheme (which is functional programming) I'll often show them analogous examples in C#. The idea is that by seeing something familiar it will make it easier for the students to understand the unfamiliar. But I'm not sure that this may actually be causing more confusion to the students. Any thoughts or suggestions on the wisdom (or lack thereof) of showing parallel code samples when teaching developers?

By the way, this is what I'm referring to by the phrase "Rosetta Code" in the question title. It's analogous to the idea of the Rosetta Stone presenting the same text in multiple languages.

EDIT

In case it wasn't clear from original question I was thinking of both the aspects of compare and contrast between languages (i. e. this is how we code a loop in C#, this is how we code it in Scheme) and the aspect of relating the unfamiliar (Scheme) by comparing it with the familiar (C#).

When working to teach developers Scheme (which is functional programming) I'll often show them analogous examples in C#. The idea is that by seeing something familiar it will make it easier for the students to understand the unfamiliar. But I'm not sure that this may actually be causing more confusion to the students. Any thoughts or suggestions on the wisdom (or lack thereof) of showing parallel code samples when teaching developers?

By the way, this is what I'm referring to by the phrase "Rosetta Code" in the question title. It's analogous to the idea of the Rosetta Stone presenting the same text in multiple languages.

When working to teach developers Scheme (which is functional programming) I'll often show them analogous examples in C#. The idea is that by seeing something familiar it will make it easier for the students to understand the unfamiliar. But I'm not sure that this may actually be causing more confusion to the students. Any thoughts or suggestions on the wisdom (or lack thereof) of showing parallel code samples when teaching developers?

By the way, this is what I'm referring to by the phrase "Rosetta Code" in the question title. It's analogous to the idea of the Rosetta Stone presenting the same text in multiple languages.

EDIT

In case it wasn't clear from original question I was thinking of both the aspects of compare and contrast between languages (i. e. this is how we code a loop in C#, this is how we code it in Scheme) and the aspect of relating the unfamiliar (Scheme) by comparing it with the familiar (C#).

2 Incorporating links from comments.
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When working to teach developers Scheme (which is functional programming) I'll often show them analogous examples in C#. The idea is that by seeing something familiar it will make it easier for the students to understand the unfamiliar. But I'm not sure that this may actually be causing more confusion to the students. Any thoughts or suggestions on the wisdom (or lack thereof) of showing parallel code samples when teaching developers?

By the way, this is what I'm referring to by the phrase "Rosetta Code" in the question title. It's analogous to the idea of the Rosetta Stone presenting the same text in multiple languages.

When working to teach developers Scheme (which is functional programming) I'll often show them analogous examples in C#. The idea is that by seeing something familiar it will make it easier for the students to understand the unfamiliar. But I'm not sure that this may actually be causing more confusion to the students. Any thoughts or suggestions on the wisdom (or lack thereof) of showing parallel code samples when teaching developers?

When working to teach developers Scheme (which is functional programming) I'll often show them analogous examples in C#. The idea is that by seeing something familiar it will make it easier for the students to understand the unfamiliar. But I'm not sure that this may actually be causing more confusion to the students. Any thoughts or suggestions on the wisdom (or lack thereof) of showing parallel code samples when teaching developers?

By the way, this is what I'm referring to by the phrase "Rosetta Code" in the question title. It's analogous to the idea of the Rosetta Stone presenting the same text in multiple languages.

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How Effective Is "Rosetta Code" as a Teaching Technique?

When working to teach developers Scheme (which is functional programming) I'll often show them analogous examples in C#. The idea is that by seeing something familiar it will make it easier for the students to understand the unfamiliar. But I'm not sure that this may actually be causing more confusion to the students. Any thoughts or suggestions on the wisdom (or lack thereof) of showing parallel code samples when teaching developers?