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A word of warning: I uavehave not used jshell in my AP Computer Science A class, but I have used the Interactions Pane to teach about Racket for the last several years, so my answer comes from a slightly different context. However, I do teach AP Computer Science, so I am familiar with the course, if not with jshell.

Regardless, after many attempts at tweaking my instructional approach with the Interactive Environment, I have recently decided that it is probably not a great way to go about instructing the class, and I am currently seeking new solutions.

The Good

Demos are quick, quick, quick in the interactive environment. You can create things with your students, have them code along, and have them see instantaneous results. It makes the learning easy and fast!

The Not-So Good

As it turns out, easy and fast is not as helpful as it sounds, because serious effort is the trigger that causes brains to undergo the arduous task of encoding difficult new information. And, true to form, I have found that my students remember very little from these demos.

I have also found that these code-along experiences in an interactive environment provide particular difficulty when students try to take notes. The best I have figured out is that they can copy and paste the entire session into a text file, but there are generally no comments to explain what is happening unless I write them in myself.

The Takeaway

An interactive environment is great tiny demos, perhaps on the scale of answering a question from a student. Otherwise, I would largely caution against the use of interactive environments as a part of lecture.

A word of warning: I uave not used jshell in my AP Computer Science A class, but I have used the Interactions Pane to teach about Racket for the last several years, so my answer comes from a slightly different context. However, I do teach AP Computer Science, so I am familiar with the course, if not with jshell.

Regardless, after many attempts at tweaking my instructional approach with the Interactive Environment, I have recently decided that it is probably not a great way to go about instructing the class, and I am currently seeking new solutions.

The Good

Demos are quick, quick, quick in the interactive environment. You can create things with your students, have them code along, and have them see instantaneous results. It makes the learning easy and fast!

The Not-So Good

As it turns out, easy and fast is not as helpful as it sounds, because serious effort is the trigger that causes brains to undergo the arduous task of encoding difficult new information. And, true to form, I have found that my students remember very little from these demos.

I have also found that these code-along experiences in an interactive environment provide particular difficulty when students try to take notes. The best I have figured out is that they can copy and paste the entire session into a text file, but there are generally no comments to explain what is happening unless I write them in myself.

The Takeaway

An interactive environment is great tiny demos, perhaps on the scale of answering a question from a student. Otherwise, I would largely caution against the use of interactive environments as a part of lecture.

A word of warning: I have not used jshell in my AP Computer Science A class, but I have used the Interactions Pane to teach about Racket for the last several years, so my answer comes from a slightly different context. However, I do teach AP Computer Science, so I am familiar with the course, if not with jshell.

Regardless, after many attempts at tweaking my instructional approach with the Interactive Environment, I have recently decided that it is probably not a great way to go about instructing the class, and I am currently seeking new solutions.

The Good

Demos are quick, quick, quick in the interactive environment. You can create things with your students, have them code along, and have them see instantaneous results. It makes the learning easy and fast!

The Not-So Good

As it turns out, easy and fast is not as helpful as it sounds, because serious effort is the trigger that causes brains to undergo the arduous task of encoding difficult new information. And, true to form, I have found that my students remember very little from these demos.

I have also found that these code-along experiences in an interactive environment provide particular difficulty when students try to take notes. The best I have figured out is that they can copy and paste the entire session into a text file, but there are generally no comments to explain what is happening unless I write them in myself.

The Takeaway

An interactive environment is great tiny demos, perhaps on the scale of answering a question from a student. Otherwise, I would largely caution against the use of interactive environments as a part of lecture.

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A word of warning: I uave not used jshell in my AP Computer Science A class, but I have used the Interactions Pane to teach about Racket for the last several years, so my answer comes from a slightly different context. However, I do teach AP Computer Science, so I am familiar with the course, if not with jshell.

Regardless, after many attempts at tweaking my instructional approach with the Interactive Environment, I have recently decided that it is probably not a great way to go about instructing the class, and I am currently seeking new solutions.

The Good

Demos are quick, quick, quick in the interactive environment. You can create things with your students, have them code along, and have them see instantaneous results. It makes the learning easy and fast!

The Not-So Good

As it turns out, easy and fast is not as helpful as it sounds, because serious effort is the trigger that causes brains to undergo the arduous task of encoding difficult new information. And, true to form, I have found that my students remember very little from these demos.

I have also found that these code-along experiences in an interactive environment provide particular difficulty when students try to take notes. The best I have figured out is that they can copy and paste the entire session into a text file, but there are generally no comments to explain what is happening unless I write them in myself.

The Takeaway

An interactive environment is great tiny demos, perhaps on the scale of answering a question from a student. Otherwise, I would largely caution against the use of interactive environments as a part of lecture.