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Tl;dr: use python. (Preferably python 3.)

Well, I’m a teenager in your age group, so hopefully I’m some level of qualified to respond.

I have to say as a bit of a disclaimer that python is my favorite language but it is in that position for a reason. Scratch is, for me, annoying to write because I can touch type so python is just faster. Further, I actually have always found scratch a bit non intuitive while on the other hand I have always found python incredibly intuitive but also very powerful - it grows in capability along with you.

When I first started programming I used khan academy’s introduction to JavaScript, and then at some point I transitioned to python and have used it since. I have never felt either overwhelmed by or limited by python. My next thought would be that as 14/15 year olds, you’re going to have kids with a wider range of abilities and python can handle that better than scratch.

There are as has been mentioned many resources for teaching python out there. I’d recommend codecademy for learning and repl.it for personal projects - they can then access their work when the camp is over and it provides autocomplete and other useful features. Another thought - since python has so many packages, maybe let them split up by what they are interested in? Python can do websites, games, scientific programming (math fans can work on the Euler problems), or mod Minecraft. (Scratch, I might point out, is limited to games.)

Hope this helps, and I’d be glad to talk with you more about resources, etc.

Well, I’m a teenager in your age group, so hopefully I’m some level of qualified to respond.

I have to say as a bit of a disclaimer that python is my favorite language but it is in that position for a reason. Scratch is, for me, annoying to write because I can touch type so python is just faster. Further, I actually have always found scratch a bit non intuitive while on the other hand I have always found python incredibly intuitive but also very powerful - it grows in capability along with you.

When I first started programming I used khan academy’s introduction to JavaScript, and then at some point I transitioned to python and have used it since. I have never felt either overwhelmed by or limited by python. My next thought would be that as 14/15 year olds, you’re going to have kids with a wider range of abilities and python can handle that better than scratch.

There are as has been mentioned many resources for teaching python out there. I’d recommend codecademy for learning and repl.it for personal projects - they can then access their work when the camp is over and it provides autocomplete and other useful features. Another thought - since python has so many packages, maybe let them split up by what they are interested in? Python can do websites, games, scientific programming (math fans can work on the Euler problems), or mod Minecraft. (Scratch, I might point out, is limited to games.)

Hope this helps, and I’d be glad to talk with you more about resources, etc.

Tl;dr: use python. (Preferably python 3.)

Well, I’m a teenager in your age group, so hopefully I’m some level of qualified to respond.

I have to say as a bit of a disclaimer that python is my favorite language but it is in that position for a reason. Scratch is, for me, annoying to write because I can touch type so python is just faster. Further, I actually have always found scratch a bit non intuitive while on the other hand I have always found python incredibly intuitive but also very powerful - it grows in capability along with you.

When I first started programming I used khan academy’s introduction to JavaScript, and then at some point I transitioned to python and have used it since. I have never felt either overwhelmed by or limited by python. My next thought would be that as 14/15 year olds, you’re going to have kids with a wider range of abilities and python can handle that better than scratch.

There are as has been mentioned many resources for teaching python out there. I’d recommend codecademy for learning and repl.it for personal projects - they can then access their work when the camp is over and it provides autocomplete and other useful features. Another thought - since python has so many packages, maybe let them split up by what they are interested in? Python can do websites, games, scientific programming (math fans can work on the Euler problems), or mod Minecraft. (Scratch, I might point out, is limited to games.)

Hope this helps, and I’d be glad to talk with you more about resources, etc.

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Well, I’m a teenager in your age group, so hopefully I’m some level of qualified to respond.

I have to say as a bit of a disclaimer that python is my favorite language but it is in that position for a reason. Scratch is, for me, annoying to write because I can touch type so python is just faster. Further, I actually have always found scratch a bit non intuitive while on the other hand I have always found python incredibly intuitive but also very powerful - it grows in capability along with you.

When I first started programming I used khan academy’s introduction to JavaScript, and then at some point I transitioned to python and have used it since. I have never felt either overwhelmed by or limited by python. My next thought would be that as 14/15 year olds, you’re going to have kids with a wider range of abilities and python can handle that better than scratch.

There are as has been mentioned many resources for teaching python out there. I’d recommend codecademy for learning and repl.it for personal projects - they can then access their work when the camp is over and it provides autocomplete and other useful features. Another thought - since python has so many packages, maybe let them split up by what they are interested in? Python can do websites, games, scientific programming (math fans can work on the Euler problems), or mod Minecraft. (Scratch, I might point out, is limited to games.)

Hope this helps, and I’d be glad to talk with you more about resources, etc.