2 grammar and spelling
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Probably mostalmost everyone can learn to play basketball, but if you intend to go up against professionals at some point, the taller you are, the better, because they are going to be tall. If you are not going to be a professional, then no problem, just have fun.

This points out the essential question: Why are we educating people?

  • So that they can get good jobs. Parents push their kids toward or away from things for this reason. (Mine pushed me away from programming, but I resisted and became a programmer and now teach programming.) It is certainly important for everyone to be able to make a decent living, so this horn of the dilemma cannot be refuted.
  • To make well-rounded people. We all need to have some understanding of a very large and rapidly growing number of topics to function well in this world. So this horn cannot be refuted either.

It would be great if students knew early on what they were interested in (as I did) and had the drive to overcome obstacles to get there (as I did), but apparently, mystifyingly, many kids and young adults simply have no idea what they want to do for a living. I don't know where the failure lies for that, but it is the cause of the seeming dilemma that we face. More drive on the part of a student will push them to either eventually succeed, or fail fast. But, like the famous basketball coach said, "You can't teach height", and we can't impart drive.

I agree with everyone who said that it is not a teacher's job to decide what is best for a student - whether they belong in the program or not. Do your best as a teacher and stop worrying about whether it can be done or not. This is the conclusion I came to after 4 years of teaching.

Probably most everyone can learn to play basketball, but if you intend to go up against professionals at some point, the taller you are, the better, because they are going to be tall. If you are not going to be a professional, then no problem, just have fun.

This points out the essential question: Why are we educating people?

  • So that they can get good jobs. Parents push their kids toward or away from things for this reason. (Mine pushed me away from programming, but I resisted and became a programmer and now teach programming.) It is certainly important for everyone to be able to make a decent living, so this horn of the dilemma cannot be refuted.
  • To make well-rounded people. We all need to have some understanding of a very large and rapidly growing number of topics to function well in this world. So this horn cannot be refuted either.

It would be great if students knew early on what they were interested in (as I did) and had the drive to overcome obstacles to get there (as I did), but apparently, mystifyingly, many kids and young adults simply have no idea what they want to do for a living. I don't know where the failure lies for that, but it is the cause of the seeming dilemma that we face. More drive on the part of a student will push them to either eventually succeed, or fail fast. But, like the famous basketball coach said, "You can't teach height", and we can't impart drive.

I agree with everyone who said that it is not a teacher's job to decide what is best for a student - whether they belong in the program or not. Do your best as a teacher and stop worrying about whether it can be done or not. This is the conclusion I came to after 4 years of teaching.

Probably almost everyone can learn to play basketball, but if you intend to go up against professionals at some point, the taller you are, the better, because they are going to be tall. If you are not going to be a professional, then no problem, just have fun.

This points out the essential question: Why are we educating people?

  • So that they can get good jobs. Parents push their kids toward or away from things for this reason. (Mine pushed me away from programming, but I resisted and became a programmer and now teach programming.) It is certainly important for everyone to be able to make a decent living, so this horn of the dilemma cannot be refuted.
  • To make well-rounded people. We all need to have some understanding of a very large and rapidly growing number of topics to function well in this world. So this horn cannot be refuted either.

It would be great if students knew early on what they were interested in (as I did) and had the drive to overcome obstacles to get there (as I did), but apparently, mystifyingly, many kids and young adults simply have no idea what they want to do for a living. I don't know where the failure lies for that, but it is the cause of the seeming dilemma that we face. More drive on the part of a student will push them to either eventually succeed, or fail fast. But, like the famous basketball coach said, "You can't teach height", and we can't impart drive.

I agree with everyone who said that it is not a teacher's job to decide what is best for a student - whether they belong in the program or not. Do your best as a teacher and stop worrying about whether it can be done or not. This is the conclusion I came to after 4 years of teaching.

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Probably most everyone can learn to play basketball, but if you intend to go up against professionals at some point, the taller you are, the better, because they are going to be tall. If you are not going to be a professional, then no problem, just have fun.

This points out the essential question: Why are we educating people?

  • So that they can get good jobs. Parents push their kids toward or away from things for this reason. (Mine pushed me away from programming, but I resisted and became a programmer and now teach programming.) It is certainly important for everyone to be able to make a decent living, so this horn of the dilemma cannot be refuted.
  • To make well-rounded people. We all need to have some understanding of a very large and rapidly growing number of topics to function well in this world. So this horn cannot be refuted either.

It would be great if students knew early on what they were interested in (as I did) and had the drive to overcome obstacles to get there (as I did), but apparently, mystifyingly, many kids and young adults simply have no idea what they want to do for a living. I don't know where the failure lies for that, but it is the cause of the seeming dilemma that we face. More drive on the part of a student will push them to either eventually succeed, or fail fast. But, like the famous basketball coach said, "You can't teach height", and we can't impart drive.

I agree with everyone who said that it is not a teacher's job to decide what is best for a student - whether they belong in the program or not. Do your best as a teacher and stop worrying about whether it can be done or not. This is the conclusion I came to after 4 years of teaching.