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This answer is a supplement to those of BenI. and ctrl-alt-delor, with a specific suggestion. Call it an implementation strategy.

Your problem is that the topic is broad, with lots of parts. You can show them the big picture by showing them a complete application that is as shallow as can be (broad but shallow). It has all the parts, but each part is as simple as you can make it. It could even be a dummy app with almost no functionality. That is a way to implement BenI.'s solution. Then have them work with it to deepen parts of it (as ctrl-alt-delor suggests) filling in gaps.

If you give them a complete simple solution it is an example of the Lay of the Land Pedagogical Pattern or Kerstin Voigt's Big Picture on a Small Scale

An alternative is to do the above but also break your solution a bit in ways that fixing it will be instructive and then give them the broken almost solution with instructions to fix it. That would make it an example of the Fixer-Upper, which can be found in the book, also.

This might be a good place to use teamwork or pairing so that the students can help one another with understanding the parts and the connections.

This answer is a supplement to those of BenI. and ctrl-alt-delor, with a specific suggestion. Your problem is that the topic is broad, with lots of parts. You can show them the big picture by showing them a complete application that is as shallow as can be (broad but shallow). It has all the parts, but each part is as simple as you can make it. It could even be a dummy app with almost no functionality. That is a way to implement BenI.'s solution. Then have them work with it to deepen parts of it (as ctrl-alt-delor suggests) filling in gaps.

If you give them a complete simple solution it is an example of the Lay of the Land Pedagogical Pattern or Kerstin Voigt's Big Picture on a Small Scale

An alternative is to do the above but also break your solution a bit in ways that fixing it will be instructive and then give them the broken almost solution with instructions to fix it. That would make it an example of the Fixer-Upper, which can be found in the book, also.

This might be a good place to use teamwork or pairing so that the students can help one another with understanding the parts and the connections.

This answer is a supplement to those of BenI. and ctrl-alt-delor, with a specific suggestion. Call it an implementation strategy.

Your problem is that the topic is broad, with lots of parts. You can show them the big picture by showing them a complete application that is as shallow as can be (broad but shallow). It has all the parts, but each part is as simple as you can make it. It could even be a dummy app with almost no functionality. That is a way to implement BenI.'s solution. Then have them work with it to deepen parts of it (as ctrl-alt-delor suggests) filling in gaps.

If you give them a complete simple solution it is an example of the Lay of the Land Pedagogical Pattern or Kerstin Voigt's Big Picture on a Small Scale

An alternative is to do the above but also break your solution a bit in ways that fixing it will be instructive and then give them the broken almost solution with instructions to fix it. That would make it an example of the Fixer-Upper, which can be found in the book, also.

This might be a good place to use teamwork or pairing so that the students can help one another with understanding the parts and the connections.

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This answer is a supplement to those of BenI. and ctrl-alt-delor, with a specific suggestion. Your problem is that the topic is broad, with lots of parts. You can show them the big picture by showing them a complete application that is as shallow as can be (broad but shallow). It has all the parts, but each part is as simple as you can make it. It could even be a dummy app with almost no functionality. That is a way to implement BenI.'s solution. Then have them work with it to deepen parts of it (as ctrl-alt-delor suggests) filling in gaps.

If you give them a complete simple solution it is an example of the Lay of the Land Pedagogical Pattern or Kerstin Voigt's Big Picture on a Small Scale

An alternative is to do the above but also break your solution a bit in ways that fixing it will be instructive and then give them the broken almost solution with instructions to fix it. That would make it an example of the Fixer-Upper, which can be found in the book, also.

This might be a good place to use teamwork or pairing so that the students can help one another with understanding the parts and the connections.