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Mini-Projects that can be covered in an 1 hour Haskell tutorial

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I am supposed to be holding a tutorial session in an Undergraduate Haskell Course, which is also supposed to be a first course in programming for a few of the students. Ideally, the tutorial should be interesting, interactive and inviting problem solving skills.

My audience is a group of Undergraduate students, a large number of which are mathematically oriented and a few graduate students, majoring in Computer Science. For the undergraduate students, it can be assumed that quietquite a few of them are new to programming or CS in general. And functional programming is new to almost everyone. This tutorial is part of a course they are all attending - the aim of which is to introduce programming.

I am wondering what sort of things I could cover in such a tutorial. Some ideas I had are these:

  • A sudoku solver
  • A Brain**** Interpretter
  • An Arithmetic Expression Parser and Interpretter
  • Discussing a data structure which the students have not seen before - like binomial heaps, or red black trees

What other things could I try? Functional Programming specific applications are especially welcome.

I am supposed to be holding a tutorial session in an Undergraduate Haskell Course, which is also supposed to be a first course in programming for a few of the students. Ideally, the tutorial should be interesting, interactive and inviting problem solving skills.

My audience is a group of Undergraduate students, a large number of which are mathematically oriented and a few graduate students, majoring in Computer Science. For the undergraduate students, it can be assumed that quiet a few of them are new to programming or CS in general. And functional programming is new to almost everyone. This tutorial is part of a course they are all attending - the aim of which is to introduce programming.

I am wondering what sort of things I could cover in such a tutorial. Some ideas I had are these:

  • A sudoku solver
  • A Brain**** Interpretter
  • An Arithmetic Expression Parser and Interpretter
  • Discussing a data structure which the students have not seen before - like binomial heaps, or red black trees

What other things could I try? Functional Programming specific applications are especially welcome.

I am supposed to be holding a tutorial session in an Undergraduate Haskell Course, which is also supposed to be a first course in programming for a few of the students. Ideally, the tutorial should be interesting, interactive and inviting problem solving skills.

My audience is a group of Undergraduate students, a large number of which are mathematically oriented and a few graduate students, majoring in Computer Science. For the undergraduate students, it can be assumed that quite a few of them are new to programming or CS in general. And functional programming is new to almost everyone. This tutorial is part of a course they are all attending - the aim of which is to introduce programming.

I am wondering what sort of things I could cover in such a tutorial. Some ideas I had are these:

  • A sudoku solver
  • A Brain**** Interpretter
  • An Arithmetic Expression Parser and Interpretter
  • Discussing a data structure which the students have not seen before - like binomial heaps, or red black trees

What other things could I try? Functional Programming specific applications are especially welcome.

4 edited out the f word
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I am supposed to be holding a tutorial session in an Undergraduate Haskell Course, which is also supposed to be a first course in programming for a few of the students. Ideally, the tutorial should be interesting, interactive and inviting problem solving skills.

My audience is a group of Undergraduate students, a large number of which are mathematically oriented and a few graduate students, majoring in Computer Science. For the undergraduate students, it can be assumed that quiet a few of them are new to programming or CS in general. And functional programming is new to almost everyone. This tutorial is part of a course they are all attending - the aim of which is to introduce programming.

I am wondering what sort of things I could cover in such a tutorial. Some ideas I had are these:

  • A sudoku solver
  • A BrainFuckBrain**** Interpretter
  • An Arithmetic Expression Parser and Interpretter
  • Discussing a data structure which the students have not seen before - like binomial heaps, or red black trees

What other things could I try? Functional Programming specific applications are especially welcome.

I am supposed to be holding a tutorial session in an Undergraduate Haskell Course, which is also supposed to be a first course in programming for a few of the students. Ideally, the tutorial should be interesting, interactive and inviting problem solving skills.

My audience is a group of Undergraduate students, a large number of which are mathematically oriented and a few graduate students, majoring in Computer Science. For the undergraduate students, it can be assumed that quiet a few of them are new to programming or CS in general. And functional programming is new to almost everyone. This tutorial is part of a course they are all attending - the aim of which is to introduce programming.

I am wondering what sort of things I could cover in such a tutorial. Some ideas I had are these:

  • A sudoku solver
  • A BrainFuck Interpretter
  • An Arithmetic Expression Parser and Interpretter
  • Discussing a data structure which the students have not seen before - like binomial heaps, or red black trees

What other things could I try? Functional Programming specific applications are especially welcome.

I am supposed to be holding a tutorial session in an Undergraduate Haskell Course, which is also supposed to be a first course in programming for a few of the students. Ideally, the tutorial should be interesting, interactive and inviting problem solving skills.

My audience is a group of Undergraduate students, a large number of which are mathematically oriented and a few graduate students, majoring in Computer Science. For the undergraduate students, it can be assumed that quiet a few of them are new to programming or CS in general. And functional programming is new to almost everyone. This tutorial is part of a course they are all attending - the aim of which is to introduce programming.

I am wondering what sort of things I could cover in such a tutorial. Some ideas I had are these:

  • A sudoku solver
  • A Brain**** Interpretter
  • An Arithmetic Expression Parser and Interpretter
  • Discussing a data structure which the students have not seen before - like binomial heaps, or red black trees

What other things could I try? Functional Programming specific applications are especially welcome.

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