3 fix misleading word
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When I was in my final year of university I threw together a quick Git cheat sheet for some fellow students I was working with who were struggling with basic use of Git. The cheatsheet is available as a bitbucket snippet.

Other than that Atlassian has a freely available git gui client for Mac and Windows called sourcetree, I've found it pretty intuitive to learn and use. Following on from that there's another tool called SmartGit which is freely available for non-commercial use and runs on all major operating systems (Win, Mac, Linux). This is an incredibly powerful git tool which gives you access to most of the functionality that Git offers, however it is a commercialproprietary piece of software which you have to pay for if you want to use it for commercial purposes.

I get by using the console commands for 99% of my work, the only time I break out a GUI is when I mess up and need to roll back changes, or for doing other complex operations.

When I was in my final year of university I threw together a quick Git cheat sheet for some fellow students I was working with who were struggling with basic use of Git. The cheatsheet is available as a bitbucket snippet.

Other than that Atlassian has a freely available git gui client for Mac and Windows called sourcetree, I've found it pretty intuitive to learn and use. Following on from that there's another tool called SmartGit which is freely available for non-commercial use and runs on all major operating systems (Win, Mac, Linux). This is an incredibly powerful git tool which gives you access to most of the functionality that Git offers, however it is a commercial piece of software which you have to pay for if you want to use it for commercial purposes.

I get by using the console commands for 99% of my work, the only time I break out a GUI is when I mess up and need to roll back changes, or for doing other complex operations.

When I was in my final year of university I threw together a quick Git cheat sheet for some fellow students I was working with who were struggling with basic use of Git. The cheatsheet is available as a bitbucket snippet.

Other than that Atlassian has a freely available git gui client for Mac and Windows called sourcetree, I've found it pretty intuitive to learn and use. Following on from that there's another tool called SmartGit which is freely available for non-commercial use and runs on all major operating systems (Win, Mac, Linux). This is an incredibly powerful git tool which gives you access to most of the functionality that Git offers, however it is a proprietary piece of software which you have to pay for if you want to use it for commercial purposes.

I get by using the console commands for 99% of my work, the only time I break out a GUI is when I mess up and need to roll back changes, or for doing other complex operations.

2 Removed unnecessary intro
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This is probably more suited as a comment but I don't have the necessary reputation to post as one.

When I was in my final year of university I threw together a quick Git cheat sheet for some fellow students I was working with who were struggling with basic use of Git. The cheatsheet is available as a bitbucket snippet.

Other than that Atlassian has a freely available git gui client for Mac and Windows called sourcetree, I've found it pretty intuitive to learn and use. Following on from that there's another tool called SmartGit which is freely available for non-commercial use and runs on all major operating systems (Win, Mac, Linux). This is an incredibly powerful git tool which gives you access to most of the functionality that Git offers, however it is a commercial piece of software which you have to pay for if you want to use it for commercial purposes.

I get by using the console commands for 99% of my work, the only time I break out a GUI is when I mess up and need to roll back changes, or for doing other complex operations.

This is probably more suited as a comment but I don't have the necessary reputation to post as one.

When I was in my final year of university I threw together a quick Git cheat sheet for some fellow students I was working with who were struggling with basic use of Git. The cheatsheet is available as a bitbucket snippet.

Other than that Atlassian has a freely available git gui client for Mac and Windows called sourcetree, I've found it pretty intuitive to learn and use. Following on from that there's another tool called SmartGit which is freely available for non-commercial use and runs on all major operating systems (Win, Mac, Linux). This is an incredibly powerful git tool which gives you access to most of the functionality that Git offers, however it is a commercial piece of software which you have to pay for if you want to use it for commercial purposes.

I get by using the console commands for 99% of my work, the only time I break out a GUI is when I mess up and need to roll back changes, or for doing other complex operations.

When I was in my final year of university I threw together a quick Git cheat sheet for some fellow students I was working with who were struggling with basic use of Git. The cheatsheet is available as a bitbucket snippet.

Other than that Atlassian has a freely available git gui client for Mac and Windows called sourcetree, I've found it pretty intuitive to learn and use. Following on from that there's another tool called SmartGit which is freely available for non-commercial use and runs on all major operating systems (Win, Mac, Linux). This is an incredibly powerful git tool which gives you access to most of the functionality that Git offers, however it is a commercial piece of software which you have to pay for if you want to use it for commercial purposes.

I get by using the console commands for 99% of my work, the only time I break out a GUI is when I mess up and need to roll back changes, or for doing other complex operations.

1
source | link

This is probably more suited as a comment but I don't have the necessary reputation to post as one.

When I was in my final year of university I threw together a quick Git cheat sheet for some fellow students I was working with who were struggling with basic use of Git. The cheatsheet is available as a bitbucket snippet.

Other than that Atlassian has a freely available git gui client for Mac and Windows called sourcetree, I've found it pretty intuitive to learn and use. Following on from that there's another tool called SmartGit which is freely available for non-commercial use and runs on all major operating systems (Win, Mac, Linux). This is an incredibly powerful git tool which gives you access to most of the functionality that Git offers, however it is a commercial piece of software which you have to pay for if you want to use it for commercial purposes.

I get by using the console commands for 99% of my work, the only time I break out a GUI is when I mess up and need to roll back changes, or for doing other complex operations.