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I think the ancient history is less relevant to a general curriculum, the context that many of us learnt to program with is not likely to help students understand the environment they will be working in in the future.

Similarly, Mores law does not predict the future (and is expected to only continue with step changes is nicein tech beyond 5nm).

What probably is relevant is to look back 10 years, and see how phones have changed, how battery tech has improved, how everyone carries broadband with them, sat-phones cover the whole planet, and many houses have well over 20 Mb Internet.

So not only are computers near enough free (outside of supercomputer) but they are far better connected. This is fairly new, and things are still changing, but you ought to be able to demonstrate some comparisons which are accessible and help students imagine how things might change.

Domestic drones are my current best example of tech which has only recently been accessible at a sensible price.

I think the ancient history is less relevant to a general curriculum, the context that many of us learnt to program with is not likely to help students understand the environment they will be working in in the future.

Similarly, Mores law does not predict the future (and is expected to only continue with step changes is nice beyond 5nm).

What probably is relevant is to look back 10 years, and see how phones have changed, how battery tech has improved, how everyone carries broadband with them, sat-phones cover the whole planet, and many houses have well over 20 Mb Internet.

So not only are computers near enough free (outside of supercomputer) but they are far better connected. This is fairly new, and things are still changing, but you ought to be able to demonstrate some comparisons which are accessible and help students imagine how things might change.

Domestic drones are my current best example of tech which has only recently been accessible at a sensible price.

I think the ancient history is less relevant to a general curriculum, the context that many of us learnt to program with is not likely to help students understand the environment they will be working in in the future.

Similarly, Mores law does not predict the future (and is expected to only continue with step changes in tech beyond 5nm).

What probably is relevant is to look back 10 years, and see how phones have changed, how battery tech has improved, how everyone carries broadband with them, sat-phones cover the whole planet, and many houses have well over 20 Mb Internet.

So not only are computers near enough free (outside of supercomputer) but they are far better connected. This is fairly new, and things are still changing, but you ought to be able to demonstrate some comparisons which are accessible and help students imagine how things might change.

Domestic drones are my current best example of tech which has only recently been accessible at a sensible price.

2 added 8 characters in body
source | link

I think the ancient history is less relevant to a general curriculum, the context that many ifof us learnt to program with is not likely to help students understand the environment they will be working in in the future.

Similarly, Mores law does not predict the future (and is expected to only continue with step changes is nice beyond 5nm).

What probably is relevant is to look back 10 years, and see how phones have changed, how battery tech has improved, how everyone carries broadband with them, sat-phones cover the whole planet, and many houses have well over 20 Mb Internet.

So not only are computers near enough free (outside of supercomputer) but they are far better connected. This is fairly new, and things are still changing, but you ought to be able to demonstrate some comparisons which are accessible and help students imagine how things might change.

Domestic drones are my current best example of tech which has only recently been accessible at a sensible price.

I think the ancient history is less relevant to a general curriculum, the context that many if us learnt to program with is not likely to help students understand the environment they will be working in in the future.

Similarly, Mores law does not predict the future (and is expected to only continue with step changes is nice beyond 5nm).

What probably is relevant is to look back 10 years, and see how phones have changed, how battery tech has improved, how everyone carries broadband with them, sat-phones cover the whole planet, and many houses have well over 20 Mb Internet.

So not only are computers near enough free (outside of supercomputer) but they are far better connected. This is fairly new, and things are still changing, but you ought to be able to demonstrate some comparisons which are accessible and help students imagine how things might change.

Domestic drones are my current best example of tech which has only recently been accessible at a sensible price.

I think the ancient history is less relevant to a general curriculum, the context that many of us learnt to program with is not likely to help students understand the environment they will be working in in the future.

Similarly, Mores law does not predict the future (and is expected to only continue with step changes is nice beyond 5nm).

What probably is relevant is to look back 10 years, and see how phones have changed, how battery tech has improved, how everyone carries broadband with them, sat-phones cover the whole planet, and many houses have well over 20 Mb Internet.

So not only are computers near enough free (outside of supercomputer) but they are far better connected. This is fairly new, and things are still changing, but you ought to be able to demonstrate some comparisons which are accessible and help students imagine how things might change.

Domestic drones are my current best example of tech which has only recently been accessible at a sensible price.

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source | link

I think the ancient history is less relevant to a general curriculum, the context that many if us learnt to program with is not likely to help students understand the environment they will be working in in the future.

Similarly, Mores law does not predict the future (and is expected to only continue with step changes is nice beyond 5nm).

What probably is relevant is to look back 10 years, and see how phones have changed, how battery tech has improved, how everyone carries broadband with them, sat-phones cover the whole planet, and many houses have well over 20 Mb Internet.

So not only are computers near enough free (outside of supercomputer) but they are far better connected. This is fairly new, and things are still changing, but you ought to be able to demonstrate some comparisons which are accessible and help students imagine how things might change.

Domestic drones are my current best example of tech which has only recently been accessible at a sensible price.