2 deleted 47 characters in body
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(this is my first answer here, so I hope it's good)

If javaJava 9 is meant, as you say, to allow better compatebilitycompatibility for older programs, then there shouldn't really be any difference in the way you teach. Some of the features added in javaJava 9 are just additions to things put in javaJava 8. You said your school teaches javaJava 8 but "but for it's worth, it might have been Java 6", so iI think there shouldntshouldn't be a difference in the way you teach java 9.

But if you are thinking of adding things that are new in javaJava 9 to your teaching, then you should introduce modular programming as the very first thing. You said 'school', so i'mI'm assuming you teach in a high-school. For high school students modular programming can be a difficult thing to understand. So make sure you teach that before teaching how javaJava 9 uses it.

Also iI think your students would learn a lot if you taught them the stream apiAPI which, as Michael0x2a said in his answer gained utility methods. Java's stream apiAPI is meant to be used with $\lambda$ expressions. This means that teaching the stream apiAPI gives your students experience with $\lambda$ expressions.

In conclusion,
Java 9 gives your students an introduction to a number of programming techniques (modular system, $\lambda$ expressions etc.) that can be useful for them after school.

(this is my first answer here, so I hope it's good)

If java 9 is meant, as you say, to allow better compatebility for older programs, then there shouldn't really be any difference in the way you teach. Some of the features added in java 9 are just additions to things put in java 8. You said your school teaches java 8 but "but for it's worth, it might have been Java 6", so i think there shouldnt be a difference in the way you teach java 9.

But if you are thinking of adding things that are new in java 9 to your teaching, then you should introduce modular programming as the very first thing. You said 'school', so i'm assuming you teach in a high-school. For high school students modular programming can be a difficult thing to understand. So make sure you teach that before teaching how java 9 uses it.

Also i think your students would learn a lot if you taught them the stream api which, as Michael0x2a said in his answer gained utility methods. Java's stream api is meant to be used with expressions. This means that teaching the stream api gives your students experience with expressions.

In conclusion,
Java 9 gives your students an introduction to a number of programming techniques (modular system, expressions etc.) that can be useful for them after school.

(this is my first answer here, so I hope it's good)

If Java 9 is meant, as you say, to allow better compatibility for older programs, then there shouldn't really be any difference in the way you teach. Some of the features added in Java 9 are just additions to things put in Java 8. You said your school teaches Java 8 but "but for it's worth, it might have been Java 6", so I think there shouldn't be a difference in the way you teach java 9.

But if you are thinking of adding things that are new in Java 9 to your teaching, then you should introduce modular programming as the very first thing. You said 'school', so I'm assuming you teach in a high-school. For high school students modular programming can be a difficult thing to understand. So make sure you teach that before teaching how Java 9 uses it.

Also I think your students would learn a lot if you taught them the stream API which, as Michael0x2a said in his answer gained utility methods. Java's stream API is meant to be used with $\lambda$ expressions. This means that teaching the stream API gives your students experience with $\lambda$ expressions.

In conclusion,
Java 9 gives your students an introduction to a number of programming techniques (modular system, $\lambda$ expressions etc.) that can be useful for them after school.

1
source | link

(this is my first answer here, so I hope it's good)

If java 9 is meant, as you say, to allow better compatebility for older programs, then there shouldn't really be any difference in the way you teach. Some of the features added in java 9 are just additions to things put in java 8. You said your school teaches java 8 but "but for it's worth, it might have been Java 6", so i think there shouldnt be a difference in the way you teach java 9.

But if you are thinking of adding things that are new in java 9 to your teaching, then you should introduce modular programming as the very first thing. You said 'school', so i'm assuming you teach in a high-school. For high school students modular programming can be a difficult thing to understand. So make sure you teach that before teaching how java 9 uses it.

Also i think your students would learn a lot if you taught them the stream api which, as Michael0x2a said in his answer gained utility methods. Java's stream api is meant to be used with expressions. This means that teaching the stream api gives your students experience with expressions.

In conclusion,
Java 9 gives your students an introduction to a number of programming techniques (modular system, expressions etc.) that can be useful for them after school.