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How do you teach, differently from how you learned? How do you overcome your own blinders?

Start by learning a new concept the other way. If you're mainly self-taught, take a college/university course for something you don't know. (Maybe as part of your continuing education requirement if your system requires that.) If you've been mainly educated using the traditional methods, learn a new subject independently, using books, and other non-class style resources. (Online courses, and MOOCSMOOCs are probably not in that list.)

Obviously this is best if it's something you don't know, and maybe even aren't really curious about, but still related to CS. This will give you the experience of learning using the "other" method.

Next, find some courses taught by instructors who learned CS both ways, self-taught and traditionally taught, and set in on their classes. This time it's not to learn the material, but to observe their teaching style, and how the students respond and learn from that style. Compare and contrast their styles relative to each other, and relative to your style of instruction. For this portion, it's preferable that you already know the subject material, while not being an "expert" in it. (You don't want to fall into the trap of evaluating their material of information, but their presentation of it.)

Lastly, find some people who are proficient in something you know, or better, teach, that learned that subject. One who learned it in a traditional setting, and one who is self-taught in it. Another instructor is useful for this. At least as useful, and probably more so, would be someone who uses that knowledge professionally outside the educational arena. Have them explain some of the concepts to you, especially concepts that your students seem to struggle with. This should be in an informal setting, such as over coffee, or lunch, rather than in a classroom environment. It can even be other users here on Stack Exchange, especially if you know them from the Stack Overflow, Code Review, or Computer Science sites. (For that you could create a new chat room where you would not be disturbing a regular chat room, and have a transcript available as a benefit.) Again, the point is not to learn the material, but to discover how they "see" it, and they attempt to explain what they "see."

After these three studies are done, your blinders are probably already gone. You can now see how others understand and conceptualize the material, and how they present it to others. Applying that knowledge to yourself, you can see what strengths there are to how you learned, and how to leverage those when teaching. You can also find what weaknesses there are, and how to overcome, or avoid, them.

With luck, you will also have managed to encounter at least one person who operates best in each of the three (VAK/VARK) learning styles, and can incorporate discoveries about that into your teaching as well. There is even an online, 20 question, survey you (or your students) can take to find out which style, if any, you favor on the EducationPlanner website here.

I mention the learning modality since you can have "blinders" on here just as you can from the way you learned, and such are likely even harder to spot or overcome. For some extra reading on the modalities affecting students try this paper by Gholami and Bagheri. With respect to online courses read Burns. For a third perspective see Fedynich, Bradley, and Bradley.

How do you teach, differently from how you learned? How do you overcome your own blinders?

Start by learning a new concept the other way. If you're mainly self-taught, take a college/university course for something you don't know. (Maybe as part of your continuing education requirement if your system requires that.) If you've been mainly educated using the traditional methods, learn a new subject independently, using books, and other non-class style resources. (Online courses, and MOOCS are probably not in that list.)

Obviously this is best if it's something you don't know, and maybe even aren't really curious about, but still related to CS. This will give you the experience of learning using the "other" method.

Next, find some courses taught by instructors who learned CS both ways, self-taught and traditionally taught, and set in on their classes. This time it's not to learn the material, but to observe their teaching style, and how the students respond and learn from that style. Compare and contrast their styles relative to each other, and relative to your style of instruction. For this portion, it's preferable that you already know the subject material, while not being an "expert" in it. (You don't want to fall into the trap of evaluating their material of information, but their presentation of it.)

Lastly, find some people who are proficient in something you know, or better, teach, that learned that subject. One who learned it in a traditional setting, and one who is self-taught in it. Another instructor is useful for this. At least as useful, and probably more so, would be someone who uses that knowledge professionally outside the educational arena. Have them explain some of the concepts to you, especially concepts that your students seem to struggle with. This should be in an informal setting, such as over coffee, or lunch, rather than in a classroom environment. It can even be other users here on Stack Exchange, especially if you know them from the Stack Overflow, Code Review, or Computer Science sites. (For that you could create a new chat room where you would not be disturbing a regular chat room, and have a transcript available as a benefit.) Again, the point is not to learn the material, but to discover how they "see" it, and they attempt to explain what they "see."

After these three studies are done, your blinders are probably already gone. You can now see how others understand and conceptualize the material, and how they present it to others. Applying that knowledge to yourself, you can see what strengths there are to how you learned, and how to leverage those when teaching. You can also find what weaknesses there are, and how to overcome, or avoid, them.

With luck, you will also have managed to encounter at least one person who operates best in each of the three (VAK/VARK) learning styles, and can incorporate discoveries about that into your teaching as well. There is even an online, 20 question, survey you (or your students) can take to find out which style, if any, you favor on the EducationPlanner website here.

I mention the learning modality since you can have "blinders" on here just as you can from the way you learned, and such are likely even harder to spot or overcome. For some extra reading on the modalities affecting students try this paper by Gholami and Bagheri. With respect to online courses read Burns. For a third perspective see Fedynich, Bradley, and Bradley.

How do you teach, differently from how you learned? How do you overcome your own blinders?

Start by learning a new concept the other way. If you're mainly self-taught, take a college/university course for something you don't know. (Maybe as part of your continuing education requirement if your system requires that.) If you've been mainly educated using the traditional methods, learn a new subject independently, using books, and other non-class style resources. (Online courses, and MOOCs are probably not in that list.)

Obviously this is best if it's something you don't know, and maybe even aren't really curious about, but still related to CS. This will give you the experience of learning using the "other" method.

Next, find some courses taught by instructors who learned CS both ways, self-taught and traditionally taught, and set in on their classes. This time it's not to learn the material, but to observe their teaching style, and how the students respond and learn from that style. Compare and contrast their styles relative to each other, and relative to your style of instruction. For this portion, it's preferable that you already know the subject material, while not being an "expert" in it. (You don't want to fall into the trap of evaluating their material of information, but their presentation of it.)

Lastly, find some people who are proficient in something you know, or better, teach, that learned that subject. One who learned it in a traditional setting, and one who is self-taught in it. Another instructor is useful for this. At least as useful, and probably more so, would be someone who uses that knowledge professionally outside the educational arena. Have them explain some of the concepts to you, especially concepts that your students seem to struggle with. This should be in an informal setting, such as over coffee, or lunch, rather than in a classroom environment. It can even be other users here on Stack Exchange, especially if you know them from the Stack Overflow, Code Review, or Computer Science sites. (For that you could create a new chat room where you would not be disturbing a regular chat room, and have a transcript available as a benefit.) Again, the point is not to learn the material, but to discover how they "see" it, and they attempt to explain what they "see."

After these three studies are done, your blinders are probably already gone. You can now see how others understand and conceptualize the material, and how they present it to others. Applying that knowledge to yourself, you can see what strengths there are to how you learned, and how to leverage those when teaching. You can also find what weaknesses there are, and how to overcome, or avoid, them.

With luck, you will also have managed to encounter at least one person who operates best in each of the three (VAK/VARK) learning styles, and can incorporate discoveries about that into your teaching as well. There is even an online, 20 question, survey you (or your students) can take to find out which style, if any, you favor on the EducationPlanner website here.

I mention the learning modality since you can have "blinders" on here just as you can from the way you learned, and such are likely even harder to spot or overcome. For some extra reading on the modalities affecting students try this paper by Gholami and Bagheri. With respect to online courses read Burns. For a third perspective see Fedynich, Bradley, and Bradley.

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How do you teach, differently from how you learned? How do you overcome your own blinders?

Start by learning a new concept the other way. If you're mainly self-taught, take a college/university course for something you don't know. (Maybe as part of your continuing education requirement if your system requires that.) If you've been mainly educated using the traditional methods, learn a new subject independently, using books, and other non-class style resources. (Online courses, and MOOCS are probably not in that list.)

Obviously this is best if it's something you don't know, and maybe even aren't really curious about, but still related to CS. This will give you the experience of learning using the "other" method.

Next, find some courses taught by instructors who learned CS both ways, self-taught and traditionally taught, and set in on their classes. This time it's not to learn the material, but to observe their teaching style, and how the students respond and learn from that style. Compare and contrast their styles relative to each other, and relative to your style of instruction. For this portion, it's preferable that you already know the subject material, while not being an "expert" in it. (You don't want to fall into the trap of evaluating their material of information, but their presentation of it.)

Lastly, find some people who are proficient in something you know, or better, teach, that learned that subject. One who learned it in a traditional setting, and one who is self-taught in it. Another instructor is useful for this. At least as useful, and probably more so, would be someone who uses that knowledge professionally outside the educational arena. Have them explain some of the concepts to you, especially concepts that your students seem to struggle with. This should be in an informal setting, such as over coffee, or lunch, rather than in a classroom environment. It can even be other users here on Stack Exchange, especially if you know them from the Stack Overflow, Code Review, or Computer Science sites. (For that you could create a new chat room where you would not be disturbing a regular chat room, and have a transcript available as a benefit.) Again, the point is not to learn the material, but to discover how they "see" it, and they attempt to explain what they "see."

After these three studies are done, your blinders are probably already gone. You can now see how others understand and conceptualize the material, and how they present it to others. Applying that knowledge to yourself, you can see what strengths there are to how you learned, and how to leverage those when teaching. You can also find what weaknesses there are, and how to overcome, or avoid, them.

With luck, you will also have managed to encounter at least one person who operates best in each of the three (VAK/VARK) learning styles, and can incorporate discoveries about that into your teaching as well. There is even an online, 20 question, survey you (or your students) can take to find out which style, if any, you favor on the EducationPlanner website here.

I mention the learning modality since you can have "blinders" on here just as you can from the way you learned, and such are likely even harder to spot or overcome. For some extra reading on the modalities affecting students try this paper by Gholami and Bagheri. With respect to online courses read Burns. For a third perspective see Fedynich, Bradley, and Bradley.